Notetaker Information

Notetaking services are provided to students registered with the Accessible Education Center (AEC), whose disability impairment(s) prevent the student from taking notes during course lecture. Notetaking services are provided to begin to eliminate the competitive disadvantage under which students with disabilities function; however, it is impossible to fully compensate for a disability. 

Notetaking Services is confidential. Students receiving notes will not have knowledge of who the Notetaker is. Equally as a Notetaker, you will not have knowledge of the student(s) receiving the notes. However, the course instructor will be provided the Notetaker name when a Notetaker is selected.

As a Notetaker you agree to the following:

  • Notetakers must be in good academic standing.
  • Notetaking is a semester-long service provided through the last class session.
  • Notetakers must attend each class session through the completion of the class.
  • Notetakers must upload notes within 48 hours of each class meeting.
  • Notes must be legible and a concise summary of the class lecture.
  • Notes must be uploaded in PDF format.

Students selected to become a Notetaker will receive priority registration for the following semester. Selected Notetakers will receive confirmation by email.

Notetaker Registration

Upload Notes

Please note you will need the following:

  • Complete application
  • SJSU ID Number
  • SJSU email address (first.last@sjsu.edu)
  • Full Name
  • Contact Information
  • Address
  • Enter the course Registration Number (5 digit course number) for each course you are interested in becoming a Notetaker.
  • Review and agree to the Notetaker Responsibilities Agreement.
  • Confirm the classes you will be providing notetaking for.

 

Notetaking Methods

There are a number of different ways to take notes, and it is best that you use the method you feel most at ease with. However, there are four general ideas that could help you to improve your note taking:

  • Use white space to separate major ideas.
  • Try to limit your notes to one concept or section per page.
  • Use abbreviations and/or symbols where possible to avoid long sentences.
  • Write down the information in your own words.

Cornell Method

Sentence Method

Charting Method

Outlining Method

 

Cornell Method

The Cornell Method provides a systematic format for condensing and organizing notes. The student divides the paper into two columns: the note-taking column (usually on the right) is twice the size of the questions/key word column (on the left). The student should leave five to seven lines, or about two in (5 cm), at the bottom of the page.

 

Sentence Method

Every new thought is written as a new line. Speed is the most desirable attribute of this method, because not much thought about formatting is needed to form the layout and create enough space for more notes. When taking these notes, you can number them or bullet them. This method can allow the reader to tell where a new thought ends and begins. This strategy is short and helpful, especially when a professor or teacher may need to read the notes.

 

Charting Method

Charting is effectively a table of rows and columns. The top row normally classifies the concept with descriptions or keywords listed in the row below.

 

Outlining Method

This method involves writing a series of topics and sub-topics, and identifying them by indenting the text, numbering the lines, or using a dash or bullet point.

A typical structure would be:

1. First main topic

A. Subtopic

1. Detail

2. Detail

B. Subtopic

2. Second main topic

A. Subtopic