Literature Review for Integrative Learning

General Topics  and by Discipline

 


General Topics


Guide to Interdisciplinary Syllabus Preparation (1996). Journal of General Education [pdf] 
, 4 (2), 3.
Association of Integrative Studies 

Braid, B. (2000). Liberal Education and the Challenge of Integrative Learning. Journal of the National Collegiate Honors Council, 1 (1), 53-58.

Discusses how four varieties of scholarship (discovery, integration, application, and teaching) can be integrated in a single undergraduate program. Uses as an example the Honors Seminars, site-specific, experiential opportunities in which students work and live together in an unfamiliar setting with all activities organized around an appropriate theme. Contrasts such an approach with typical segmented curricula.

Cecil, D., & Koester, S. H. (1999, November). Reversing a Century's Damage: Undoing Harvard's Legacy of Separate Courses for Freshman Speaking and Writing. Paper presented at the National Communication Association.

Writing students gain much of their knowledge about writing in speech class, largely through their ears rather than solely through their eyes and intellect. The problem of student writers being removed from a significant audience could be substantially reduced if introductory speaking and writing courses were combined. At a University of Alaska campus, a two-year pilot course was developed which melded first semester freshman writing with the basic oral communication course.

Czechowski, J. (2003). An Integrated Approach to Liberal Learning. peerReview, 5(4), 4-7.

Calls for a strong liberal education founded on a carefully, intentionally, and innovatively integrated curriculum within and across the major, the core, and the co curriculum. The transformative integration required to accomplish this takes a lot of work and will require a great deal of faculty involvement.

Integrative Learning Project: Opportunities to Connect

A national project sponsored by The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching and the Association of American Colleges and Universities (AAC&U). The two organizations are working with 10 selected campuses to develop and assess advanced models and strategies to help students pursue learning in more intentional, connected ways. Source for review for Integrative Learning Project: Opportunities to Connect 

Froyd, J. E., & Ohland, M. W. (2006). First-year Integrated Curriculum Projects - Summary. Retrieved Jan. 31, 2006. 

A chart and references describe 15 Engineering programs that offer first-year integrated curriculum, including UC Berkeley and Arizona State .

Graff, G. (1991, February 13). Colleges are Depriving Students of a Connected View of Scholarship. The Chronicle of Higher Education, p. 48.

Traces what the author calls the course fetish, the assumption that the natural unit of instruction is the autonomous course, one not in direct dialogue with other courses. The classes being taught at any moment on a campus represent rich potential conversations between scholars and across disciplines. But since these conversations are experienced as a series of monologues, the possible links are apparent only to the minority of students who can connect disparate ideas on their own.
Source for review for Colleges are Depriving Students of a Connected View of Scholarship 

Huber, M. T., & Hutchings, P. (2004). Integrative Learning: Mapping the Terrain. The Academy in Transition. Washington, DC.: Association of American Colleges and Universities.

One of the great challenges in higher education is to help students integrate their learning. The capacity to make connections is essential to the conduct of personal, professional, and civic life, and is at the very heart of liberal education. Authors draw on AAC&U's landmark report "Greater Expectations" as well as the Carnegie Foundation's long-standing initiative on the scholarship of teaching and learning. Source for review Integrative Learning: Mapping the Terrain 

Huber, M. T., Hutchings, P., & Gale, R. (2005). Integrative Learning for Liberal Education. peerReview.

"Whether one is talking about making connections within a major, between fields, between curriculum and co-curriculum, or between academic knowledge in practice, integrative learning requires work."
Source for review for Integrative Learning for Liberal Education 

Jackson, N. J. (1999). Modeling Change in a National HE System Using the Concept of Unification. Journal of Education Policy, 14 (4), 411-434

Educational systems' academic and occupational training may be categorized as compartmentalized (tracked), systematically connected (linked), or fully integrated (unified). Such a typology might be used to model strategic change at higher levels of the UK system of postsecondary training. Successive governments have employed numerous agendas leading to a more unified system. (Contains 68 references.)

Kain, D. L. (1993). Cabbages--And Kings: Research Directions in Integrated /Interdisciplinary Curriculum. Journal of Educational Thought/Revue de la PenseeEducative, 27(3), 312-331.

Examines past research into integrated or interdisciplinary studies and explores future directions for research. Discusses reasons for integrating curricula, characteristics of integrated studies, benefits of curriculum integration, and pedagogical changes accompanying integrated studies. Predicts an unstable future for integrated studies. Recommends a broad research agenda.

Klein, J. T. (1999). Mapping interdisciplinary studies. Washington , DC . : Association of American Colleges and Universities.

Provides an overview of current trends in disciplinary change, interdisciplinary fields, and general education and discusses why interdisciplinarity is taking hold in the academy today. Also presents talking points for dialogue on the topics of integrating curriculum, integrative process and pedagogies, assessment, faculty development, institutional change, and support strategies.

Greene, E. (2000). An Emulated General-Education Program Finds Itself Under Attack at Home. Chronicle of Higher Education, 46 (47), A16-18.

Reports on controversy surrounding Portland ( Oregon ) State University 's nationally renowned, interdisciplinary general education program. Critics feel the four-year curriculum, which focuses on learning processes rather than content, has resulted in a watered-down curriculum that doesn't teach enough writing, math, literature, science, art, and other subjects.

Levine, D. N. (2000). Where Are Our Educational Traditions When We Most Need Them? Liberal Education, 86(1).

Discusses curricular tradition in liberal higher education and proposes a schema of curricular principles emphasizing the character of the learner, the world to be known, a common heritage of humanity, and kinds of disciplines. Uses the University of Chicago 's past and current curricula to illustrate the ongoing search for curricular coherence.

Pasadeos, Y. (2000). Conflicting Attitudes toward an Integrated Curriculum. Journalism and Mass Communication Educator, 55 (1), 73-38.

Argues that many of the agents of transmission of persuasive communication to the classroom (i.e., public relations and advertising educators) are not as well prepared for the task as might be thought. Considers how curricular integration in advertising and public relations makes good economic sense, but to also make good educational sense it needs well-prepared instructors.

Scott, D. K. (2002). General Education for an Integrative Age. Higher Education Policy, 15(1), 7-18.

Begins by outlining current challenges for educational systems, then describes the evolution of universities in the Western world and recent changes, particularly the trend towards more integrative approaches to knowledge. Describes recent developments in theories of the mind, which reinforce the trend towards an integrative worldview. Offers directions for general education or integrative learning in the 21st century.

Sill, D. J. (1996). Integrative Thinking, Synthesis, and Creativity in Interdisciplinary Studies. Journal of General Education, 45 (2), 129-151.

Argues that current practices for teaching integrative thinking skills are inadequate partly because no model exists to understand such efforts. Proposes a model for teaching integrative thinking based on existing models of creativity and synthesis. Discusses implications of the model for interdisciplinary studies.

Vaz, R. F. (2000). Connected Learning: Interdisciplinary Projects in International Settings. Liberal Education, 86(1), 24-31.

Describes the project-based curriculum structure at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (Massachusetts) which aims at giving students a global perspective and the skills to work collaboratively across disciplinary borders. Focuses on one of three required project experiences, integrating technical knowledge with humanities and social sciences, which students complete as part of a multidisciplinary team in an international setting.

Viswat, L. J., Duppenthaler, C. E., Nishi, K., & Podziewski, K. (2003). A Pilot Study on a Coordinated Approach to Language Instruction. Bulletin of theEducational Research Institute, 21, 79-92.

This study examined whether linking classes with a common syllabus would have a positive impact on students' English progress and attitudes toward language learning. Participants were Japanese college students studying English as a Second Language. Results supported the hypotheses.

Walker, D. (1996). Integrative Education. Eugene OR: ERIC Clearinghouse on Educational Management.

"Reformers contend that teaching facts and skills in a school day artificially compartmentalized into separate subjects fails to prepare students for a swiftly changing world. Through integrative education, educators seek to improve students' basic skills in language arts and mathematics while also teaching thinking skills, physical and sensing skills, and social skills."
Source for review for Integrative Education 

Winner, M. C. (1998). Librarians as Partners in the Classroom: An Increasing Imperative. RSR: Reference Services Review, 26 (1), 25-30.

Outlines methods to promote effective curriculum development through faculty-librarian partnerships. Recognition of the role of librarians as instructors is discussed related to: position descriptions and workloads; flexible work standards; joint appointments; compensation for added instructional loads, including temporary or part-time appointments; and appropriate physical facilities. World Wide Web sources on critical information competence are listed.

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by Discipline

Business | Engineering | ePortfolios | Health Sciences | Learning Communities | Mathematics | Science | Service Learning | Teacher Education |

Business

Brown, B. J. (Ed.). (2000). Management of the Business Classroom (Vol. 39): National Business Education Association.

This document contains 15 papers devoted to the theme of management of business education including: "Integrating Business Education Programs with Other Disciplines" (Sandra R. Williams, Billie J. Herrin, Robyn J. Taylor); "School-to-Career Initiatives: Integrating Business Education with the Core Curriculum" (Joan Whittemore Loock, Michael James Tokheim). Includes substantial bibliographies.

Lorents, A., Morgan, J., & Tallman, G. (2003). The Impact of Course Integration on Student Grades. Journal of Education for Business, 78(3), 135-138.

Grades from 112 students in 3 business courses integrated in block format were compared with those of 151 other business majors. High achievers did not self-select into blocks. Grading rigor did not suffer and grades were more correlated in block presentation, possibly because of content integration.

Pharr , S. W. (2000). Foundational Considerations for Establishing an Integrated Business Common Core Curriculum .Journal of Education for Business, 76 (1), 20-23.

Presents the foundational issues (attitude, infrastructure, resources) on which integrated business school programs should be established and examines the influence they have on the success or failure of integration efforts. Includes a "readiness test" to facilitate future integration efforts. (Contains 10 references.)

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Engineering

Brinkman, G. W., & van der Geest, T. M. (2003). Assessment of Communication Competencies in Engineering Design Projects. Technical Communication Quarterly, 12(1), 67-81.

Notes that reforms in engineering education have caused a shift from the traditional stand-alone courses in technical communication for engineering students towards communication training integrated in courses and design projects that allows students to develop four levels of competence. Describes three formats for integrated communication training: linked to design projects, integrated in design projects, and integrated at program level.

Froyd, J. E. (2000). Integrated, First-Year Curriculum in Science, Engineering, and Mathematics - A Ten-Year Process . Terre Haute, IN: Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology.

The Integrated, First-Year Curriculum in Science, Engineering, and Mathematics (IFYCSEM) restructures first-year courses in calculus, mechanics (physics), engineering statistics, electricity and magnetism (physics), computer science, chemistry, engineering graphics, and engineering design to create a three-course, twelve-credit-per-quarter sequence.

Malave, C. O., & Watson, K. L. (2000). The Freshman Integrated Curriculum at Texas A&M University. College Station, TX : Texas A&M University.Source for review The Freshman Integrated Curriculum at Texas A&M University [pdf] 

This paper presents implementation details related to the freshman integrated curriculum at Texas A&M University. Presents a brief summary of the design and pilot implementation phases done under the Foundation Coalition Program. The paper also provides a description of the institutionalization and scale-up phases, which lead to the current freshman integrated curriculum at the College of Engineering.

Willson, V. L., Ackerman, C., & Malave, C. (2000). Cross-Time Attitudes, Concept Formation, and Achievement in College Freshman Physics.Journal of Research inScience Teaching, 37 (10), 1112-1120.

Explores the relationships among science and engineering attitudes, physics conceptual understanding, and physics achievement for a population of college freshman engineering students. Assesses a sample of freshman engineering students (n=200) participating in an integrated curriculum with the Force Concepts Inventory (FCI), Mechanics Baseline Test (MBT), and a locally developed attitude measure. (Contains 21 references.)

Roberts, J. A., & Barnhill, R. E. (2001, Oct 10-13). Engineering Togetherness (An Incentive System for Interdisciplinary Research). Paper presented at the 2001 IEEE/ASEE Frontiers in Education Conference, Reno, NV.

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ePortfolios

Elphick, R. H., & Weitzer, W. H. (2000). Coherence Without a Core: Curriculum Planning, Electronic Portfolios, and Enhanced Advising in the Liberal Arts. Liberal Education, 86 (1), 16-23.

Describes changes at Wesleyan University ( Connecticut ) since 1997 to foster curricular coherence in the liberal arts without imposing a curricular core. Changes include an on-line registration system, a curriculum plan for the first two years which helps students create sequences of interdisciplinary study in addition to the major, Web-based electronic portfolios for students, and an enhanced faculty advisory system.

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Health Sciences

Jacobs, S. K., Rosenfeld, P., & Haber, J. (2003). Information Literacy as the Foundation for Evidence-Based Practice in Graduate Nursing Education: A Curriculum-Integrated Approach. Journal of Professional Nursing, 19(5), 320-328.

Because competency in information literacy was considered important for future evidence-based practice, instructional modules on information literacy were integrated into five core nursing master's courses complemented by a web-based tutorial. Students' information literacy competencies were assessed at entry and 1-year intervals.

Rundquist, I., Bergdahl, B., Sandstrom, I. , & Hammar, M. (1998). A Point System for Management of an Integrated Problem-based Learning Curriculum. Educationfor Health: Change in Training and Practice, 11 (1), 7-14.

At Linkoping University , medical education focused on problem-based learning was introduced, with an unchanged budget, but a new method of resource management. The point system for teaching and administrative tasks gives better control of resources and increases departments' motivation to participate.

Shore, M. A., & Shore, J. B. (2003). An Integrative Curriculum Approach to Developmental Mathematics and the Health Professions Using Problem Based Learning. Mathematics and Computer Education, 37(1), 29-38.

Investigates the transformation of a developmental mathematics curriculum from a 30-year-old, non-applied passive learner environment to a curriculum that engages students in active learning situations rich in meaningful health-related applications using problem based learning (PBL). Describes the purpose of the Fund for the Improvement of Post-Secondary Education (FIPSE) project and its outcomes.

Wukasch, R. N., Blue, C. L., & Overbay, J. (2000). A Curriculum Model for an Integrated Senior Year Clinical Experience. Nursing and Health Care Perspectives, 21 (2), 71-75.

A flexible clinical experience for nursing seniors integrates pediatrics, public health, and nursing leadership. Experiences in hospital units, schools, nurse-directed clinics, and home visits expose students to a wide range of settings and issues.

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Learning Communities

Kellogg, K. (1999). ERIC Digest: Learning Communities. Washington, DC.: George Washington Univ. Graduate School of Education and Human Development.

Learning communities have expanded in the last two decades to include five major higher education models:

  • linked courses
  • learning clusters
  • freshmen interest groups
  • federated learning communities with multiple discipline classes and an additional class focusing on the relation between the disciplines
  • coordinated studies with a full-time active learning and interdisciplinary theme

Golde, C. M., & Pribbenow, D. A. (2000). Understanding Faculty Involvement in Residential Learning Communities. Journal of College Student Development, 41(1), 27-40.

Through interviews with faculty members in two residential learning communities at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, explores the experiences and motivations of 15 faculty members who became involved and stayed involved in these programs. Also explores the implications for collaborative efforts between student affairs and academic affairs.

MacGregor, J. (2000). Restructuring Large Classes To Create Communities of Learners. New Directions for Teaching and Learning (81), 47-61.

Discusses some initiatives that address problems of a fragmented curriculum and student isolation in large college classes through restructuring. These include peer-facilitated learning communities (such as emerging scholars programs), linked-class learning communities (e.g., linked writing courses), course-cluster learning communities, and learning communities as teaching communities.

Stefanou, C. R., & Salisbury-Glennon, J. D. (2002). Developing Motivation and Cognitive Learning Strategies through an Undergraduate Learning Community.Learning Environments Research, 5(1), 77-97.

Describes the effects of an undergraduate learner-centered community of learners approach to instruction on student motivation and cognitive learning strategies. Discusses objectives, including integrated courses, active and collaborative learning, and opportunities for learning through information technology and library resources; and describes workshops for instructor training to develop the learning communities.

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Mathematics

Deeds, D. G., Allen, C. S., Callen, B. W., & Wood, M. D. (2000). A New Paradigm in Integrated Math and Science Courses: Finding Common Ground across Disciplines. Journal of College Science Teaching, 30 (2), 178-183

Describes an interdisciplinary curriculum designed to connect math, science, and technology with students' lives. Changing students' understanding of science required building connections across disciplines, building support among colleagues, and building trust with the administration.

Kirtland, J., & Hoh, P. S. (2002). Integrating Mathematics and Composition Instruction. Primus, 12(1).

Describes the development of an integrated approach for teaching mathematics and writing to freshmen. The goals are to strengthen mathematical skills, develop writing competencies, and foster interdisciplinary awareness.

Grace, D. J., & Picard, A. (2001). An Experimental Approach to Integrating Mathematics and Literacy Methods Courses. Action in Teacher Education, 23(1), 29-36.

Investigated the value of a team-taught, integrated, elementary-level methods course. Student teacher surveys indicated that it was a beneficial learning experience for all which enabled students to see connections across content areas and understand how to explore subjects through inquiry and a unifying theme. Many students reported feeling better prepared for student teaching.

Matthews, M. W., & Rainer, J. D. (2001). The Quandaries of Teachers and Teacher Educators in Integrating Literacy and Mathematics. Language Arts, 78(4), 357-364.

Discusses the complexities of work with elementary teachers who attempted to integrate literacy and mathematics instruction in their classrooms. Presents a study that involves three interwoven components: constructivist principles, collaborative graduate work, and a literacy and mathematics study. Sees both literacy and mathematics as languages and tools through which to learn about the world.

Shapiro, D. F. (2003). Facilitating Holistic Curriculum Development.Assessment & Evaluation in Higher Education, 28(4), 423-434.

Reports on a case study that illustrates how internal curriculum assessment processes used by an environmental science and policy department led to the creation of an innovative tenure-track faculty line for someone whose primary activities and scholarship focus not on traditional disciplinary scholarship but instead on coordinating the holistic development of an integrated curriculum.

Shore, M. A., & Shore, J. B. (2003). An Integrative Curriculum Approach to Developmental Mathematics and the Health Professions Using Problem Based Learning.Mathematics and Computer Education, 37(1), 29-38.

Investigates the transformation of a developmental mathematics curriculum from a 30-year-old, non-applied passive learner environment to a curriculum that engages students in active learning situations rich in meaningful health-related applications using problem based learning (PBL). Describes the purpose of the Fund for the Improvement of Post-Secondary Education (FIPSE) project and its outcomes.

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Science

Froyd, J. E. (2000). Integrated, First-Year Curriculum in Science, Engineering, and Mathematics - A Ten-Year Process . Terre Haute, IN: Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology.

The Integrated, First-Year Curriculum in Science, Engineering, and Mathematics (IFYCSEM) restructures first-year courses in calculus, mechanics (physics), engineering statistics, electricity and magnetism (physics), computer science, chemistry, engineering graphics, and engineering design to create a three-course, twelve-credit-per-quarter sequence. Source for review for Integrated, First-Year Curriculum in Science, Engineering, and Mathematics. A Ten-Year Process [pdf] (not available online at the present)

Deeds, D. G., Allen, C. S., Callen, B. W., & Wood, M. D. (2000). A New Paradigm in Integrated Math and Science Courses: Finding Common Ground across Disciplines. Journal of College Science Teaching, 30 (2), 178-183.

Describes an interdisciplinary curriculum designed to connect math, science, and technology with students' lives. Changing students' understanding of science required building connections across disciplines, building support among colleagues, and building trust with the administration.

Galotti, K. M., Elveton, R. O., Komatsu, L. K., Rand, M. S., & Singer, S. R. (2000). Origins and Mind: An Integrated Academic Experience for New Students. Liberal Education, 86 (1), 32-39.

Linking courses from three disciplines (biology, philosophy, and psychology) around a common theme, five faculty members at Carleton College (Minnesota) planned, implemented, and evaluated a course for first-year students. Analysis of student responses to the course leads to discussion of the effectiveness of such linkages and the importance of institutional support.

Hecke, G. R. V., Karukstis, K. K., Haskell, R. C., McFadden, C. S., & Wettack, F. S. (2002). An Integration of Chemistry, Biology, and Physics: The Interdisciplinary Laboratory. Journal of Chemical Education, 79(7), 837-844.

Reports on a first-year laboratory sequence known as the Interdisciplinary Laboratory (ID Lab) introduced at Harvey Mudd College. The course seeks to illustrate commonality of investigative methods and laboratory techniques in biology, chemistry, and physics and introduce discipline-specific principles.

Jennings, T. (Ed.). (1997). Restructuring for Integrative Education: Multiple Perspectives, Multiple Contexts. Westport , CT: Bergin & Garvey.

The collection of essays asserts that assisting the complex ways in which students actually create meaning and learn must be the nexus of educational restructuring. Chapters on Integrative learning include: chapter 2, "Service Learning and the Liberal Arts: Restructuring for Integrated Education" (Robbin D. Crabtree); chapter 5, "Restructuring Classroom Management for More Interactive and Integrated Teaching and Learning" (Barbara Larrivee); and chapter 8, "Restructuring as an Integrative Process" (Sam Crowell and Renate Caine) Jennings is an Associate Professor and Chairman of the Department of Learning, Literacy and Culture at the School of Education at California State University, San Bernardino.

Shapiro, D. F. (2003). Facilitating Holistic Curriculum Development.Assessment & Evaluation in Higher Education, 28(4), 423-434.

Reports on a case study that illustrates how internal curriculum assessment processes used by an environmental science and policy department led to the creation of an innovative tenure-track faculty line for someone whose primary activities and scholarship focus not on traditional disciplinary scholarship but instead on coordinating the holistic development of an integrated curriculum.

Venville, G. J., Wallace, J., Rennie, L. J., & Malone, J. A. (2002). Curriculum Integration: Eroding the High Ground of Science as a School Subject? Studies inScience Education, 37, 43-83.

Explores the issue of curriculum integration, with a particular focus on science as a discipline and its relationship with other subjects. Presents the exploration in the form of a research journey.

Facilitating Holistic CurriculumWillson, V. L., Ackerman, C., & Malave, C. (2000). Cross-Time Attitudes, Concept Formation, and Achievement in College Freshman Physics. Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 37 (10), 1112-1120.

Explores the relationships among science and engineering attitudes, physics conceptual understanding, and physics achievement for a population of college freshman engineering students. Assesses a sample of freshman engineering students (n=200) participating in an integrated curriculum with the Force Concepts Inventory (FCI), Mechanics Baseline Test (MBT), and a locally developed attitude measure. (Contains 21 references.)

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Service Learning

Harkavy, I. , & Romer, D. (1999). Service Learning as an Integrated Strategy.Liberal Education, 85 (3), 14-19.

Raises concerns about effectiveness of service learning efforts to engage students in community problems as part of an integrated curriculum. Suggests the HIV epidemic as a situation requiring the diverse resources of modern colleges and universities and proposes partnerships with local communities to address the problem. Programs at the University of Alabama and Bryn Mawr College (Pennsylvania) are described.

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Teacher Education


Freeland, K., & Willis, M. (1999). Integrated College Methods Courses. Morehead KY: Morehead State University.

This study compared the performance of two groups of pre-service teachers at Kentucky 's Morehead State University . One group had taken four of their methods courses (reading, language arts, social studies, and mathematics) in an integrated fashion from four faculty members. The other group took the four methods courses separately. Data analysis indicated that the students taking integrated courses performed as well as, or better than, the student teachers taking courses in the traditional separate approach.

Jory, B. (Ed.). (2001). Campbell Monograph Series on Education and Human Sciences (Vol. 2).

Features articles that explore educational and professional collaborations. These include "The Art of Collaboration, The Science of Teaching" (Brian Jory), "An Integrated Approach to Gender Equity in Schools" (Susan Logsdon Conradsen and Michelle Rosen Haney); and "Interdisciplinary Curriculum as Complementary Practice: A Philosophical Perspective" (Alvin H.F. Smith).

Matthews, M. W., & Rainer, J. D. (2001). The Quandaries of Teachers and Teacher Educators in Integrating Literacy and Mathematics. Language Arts, 78(4), 357-364.

Discusses the complexities of work with elementary teachers who attempted to integrate literacy and mathematics instruction in their classrooms. Presents a study that involves three interwoven components: constructivist principles, collaborative graduate work, and a literacy and mathematics study. Sees both literacy and mathematics as languages and tools through which to learn about the world.

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