Course Learning Objectives

Class

Learning Objectives

CHEM 1A

This is a list of very specific learning objectives for Chem 1A lecture. The lab will also provide hands-on opportunities to develop and apply this knowledge. If a specific objective is also partially addressed with an experiment, then the experiment number has been included in parenthesis. Please note that for many of the topics in this course real world examples are used. Also, on occasion, the topics result in brief discussions of economic and societal issues and some historical development can also be done so as to see the role science played in certain world events.

 The student will be able to:
1) apply significant figures rules in all calculations providing the correct number of significant figures and units (Exp 1, 2, 6, 7, 10, 11 and 12)

2) convert between different units using conversion factors and dimensional analysis (Exp. 1)

3) name elements, provide their symbols and determine the number of protons, neutrons, electrons and nuclei in elements and compounds

3) calculate percent composition given a molecular formula and molecular formula given the percent composition (Exp. 2)

4) name salts, acids, bases and covalent compounds and provide formulas for these given a molecular formula (Exp. 3)

5) explain the difference between solubility and dissociation in water and apply this knowledge to acids, bases and salts (Exp. 3)

6) identify weak and strong acids and bases and insoluble compounds using dissociation and solubility rules (Exp. 3 and 4)

7) construct molecular, total and net ionic equations for double displacement reactions (Exp. 3 and 4)

8) identify redox reactions including identifying the oxidation, reduction, oxidation agent and reducing agent (Exp. 5)

9) calculate oxidation numbers and balance redox reactions (Exp. 5)

10) perform stoichiometry calculations for chemical and non-chemical systems whether the limiting reactant is known or unknown (Exp. 6 and 10)

11) calculate molarity of a solution starting with pure solute or with a concentrated solution as well as explain how to prepare a solution of a given molarity (Exp. 6)

12) provide brief descriptions of the accomplishments of Planck, Einstein, Thompson, Rutherford, Millikan, Rydberg, Bohr, de Broglie and Schrodinger; and how these contributed to understanding the atom

13) explain how a cathode ray tube works and how it assisted in understanding the electronic configuration of atoms.

14) convert between wavelength, energy and frequency for light and understand the relationship between absorbed light and color (Exp. 7)

15) calculate the energy and wavelength of a given electronic transition in hydrogen (Exp. 7)

16) define what each quantum number represents and how to obtain quantum numbers for any electron in an atom

17) analyze an atom or ion of a given element providing the full electronic configuration, the abbreviated electronic configuration, the nlx notation, a representative diagram of the orbitals and the unpaired number of electrons; then use this information to determine the possible oxidation states of the element and the magnetic properties of the element (Exp. 8)

18) define electronegativity, electron affinity and ionization potential

19) organize a set of element or monoatomic ions in order of increasing atomic radius, ionic radius, first ionization energy and electronegativity

20) determine whether a bond is metallic, ionic, covalent or polar covalent

21) represent covalent and ionic bonding using Lewis dot structures

22) evaluate the molecular geometry, hybridization and polarity of a covalent molecule (Exp. 9)

23) evaluate the type of molecular bonding(s or p) in a covalent molecule and identify the orbitals used for bonding

24) explain the properties of temperature and pressure including how these are measured and convert between different units for these properties, including the use of different liquids in the measurement of pressure (Exp. 10)

25) derive the relationships between pressure, volume, temperature and moles for ideal gases; perform calculations using these relations, including when they are combined with stoichiometry or percent composition problems (Exp. 10)

26) define and apply Dalton’s Law of Partial Pressures and Graham’s Law of Diffusion and Effusion to mixtures of gases (Exp. 10)

27) use the results from the Kinetic Molecular Theory of Gases to explain the relationship between kinetic energy, average molecular velocity, temperature, pressure, density and number of collisions when an ideal gas undergoes a change of state

28) describe and provide examples of the five types of intermolecular forces and be able to analyze the forced present in a substance and organize a set of compounds in order of increasing intermolecular forces (Exp. 11)

29) define the terms and explain the temperature dependence of surface tension, viscosity, vapor pressure, normal boiling point, capillary action; and be able to organize a set of compounds in increasing order for most of these properties (Exp. 11)

30) explain the concept of specific heat and apply the equation to heating or cooling of materials

31) perform heat transfer calculations for systems with and without phase changes (Exp 12)

32) calculate heats of reaction using Hess’ Law or heats of formation, including combining the process with stoichiometry, and identify whether the reaction is exothermic or endothermic (Exp 12)

33) name unsubstituted and substituted alkanes, alkenes and alkynes given a drawing of a molecule and vice versa

34) identify all the isomers associated with simple aliphatic hydrocarbons and predict boiling point and vapor pressure change as a function of the number of carbons

35) identify and name the organic functional groups in a molecule

CHEM 1B  

If a specific objective is also partially addressed with an experiment, then the experiment number has been in parenthesis. Please note that for many of the topics in this course real world examples are used and are analyzed by students. Also, on occasion, the topics result in brief discussions of economic or societal issues.

 The student will be able to:
1) calculate concentration using different units and convert between different concentration units (molarity, %, ppm, g/L, etc.)   (Exp. 13, 16, 19, 23)

2) calculate concentration changes associated with dilution (Exp. 13, 20, 22, 24)

 3) solve stoichiometry problems using concentration or mass including balancing redox, combustion and double displacement reactions, and calculations with known or unknown limiting reagents (Exp. 16, 19, 21)

4) predict heats of reaction using bond energies and compare these values to heat of reaction obtained from Hess’ Law or heats of formation calculations

5) define entropy and evaluate the sign of entropy for compounds, physical processes and chemical reactions (Exp 15)

6) calculate the entropy for a reaction given molar entropies for the compounds

7) evaluate whether a chemical reaction will occur using predictions for the sign of heat of reaction and entropy and whether altering the temperature of the reaction will affect product formation (Exp. 15)

8) calculate Gibbs free energy using data for heat of reaction and entropy or Gibbs free energy of formation for compounds

9) explain the effect concentration, temperature, presence of a catalyst and physical state have on the rate of a reaction and predict what effect changing these variables will have on the rate of reaction (Exp. 17)

10) derive the rate law for chemical and non chemical systems using data and then use the rate law to obtain half life and determine the amount of product formed at a given time or vice versa

11) apply Arrhenuis’ equation to chemical systems to obtain activation energy and explain the effect of temperature on chemical reaction rate at molecular level (Exp. 17)

12) construct a rate law using a reaction mechanism and evaluate reaction mechanisms to predict whether they are plausible based on rate law information.

13) define the terms catalysis and inhibitor; and compare data for reaction rates to determine whether a reaction is catalyzed or inhibited by selected compounds (Exp. 17)

14) construct the mathematical expression for an equilibrium constant given a chemical equilibrium and use thermodynamic or experimental data to find the value of the equilibrium constant (Exp. 18, 20, 21)

15) use reaction quotient to determine the direction a chemical system must shift to reach equilibrium

16) calculate equilibrium concentrations given initial concentrations and an equilibrium constant

17) use Le Chatelier’s principle to explain the effect changes in temperature, pressure, volume and addition/removal of a reagent will have on a system at equilibrium; use this principle to plan how to get an equilibrium to produce more products

18) define and identify acids and bases based on their types (conjugate, weak, strong, Arrhenius, etc.)

19) calculate an equilibrium constant for a weak acid or base given pH data (Exp. 20)

20) analyze acid base equilibria so as to determine the type of equilibrium and utilize this information to calculate the pH of the solution

21) define a buffer clearly describing how it works and why buffers are important; given a buffer system calculate the pH (Exp. 20, 25)

22) design a buffer system given the pH region where it must serve as a buffer and the total concentration of ions needed (Exp. 25)

23) calculate the equilibrium constant for an insoluble salt given solubility data and vice versa, calculate the solubility of a insoluble substance when given Ksp (Exp. 21)

24) use the solubility product to determine whether a precipitate will form when solutions are mixed, including the effect pH might have on the given system

25) organize compounds in order of increasing strength as acids or solubility given equilibrium constants

26) calculate standard cell potentials for any redox reaction and combine this information with concentration data to determine the effect concentration will have on the cell potential (Exp. 22)

27) draw a redox cell diagram given cell notation, identify all the components, reactions occurring and, if applicable, the roles selected components play (Exp. 22)

28) determine cell potentials using thermodynamic data

29) cite the differences between chemical reactions and nuclear reactions; list the biological effects of radiation exposure

30) balance nuclear reactions identifying which nuclear particles are involved in the process and use the neutron to proton ratio to predict the possible types of nuclear decay an isotope could undergo

31) calculate mass differences and binding energies for nuclei and nuclear reactions; use this information to identify species that can undergo fusion or fission

32) calculate kinetic parameters for nuclear decay including applications to radioactive dating

33) list the colligative properties of solutions, explaining how and why each property is affected by an increase in the amount of solute (Exp. 23)

34) calculate the osmotic pressure of a solution.

CHEM 8
  • Appreciation for the nature and scope of organic chemistry.
  • Application of key concepts from general chemistry including electronegativity, bonding (ionic and covalent), hybridization of atomic orbitals, and molecular orbital theory to organic systems.
  • Draw valence bond and Lewis dot structure for organic species, including formal charges.
  • Draw skeletal structures for organic compounds.
  • Apply acid-base concepts to organic systems; predict ordering of acid or base strength.
  • Name alkanes, alkenes, polyenes, alkynes, alkyl halides, aromatic compounds, carbonyl compounds, amines and their various derivatives using systematic (IUPAC) nomenclature.
  • Learn common names for some key chemicals.
  • Draw reaction mechanisms for some key reactions.
  • Recognize stereochemistry and be able to apply the Cahn-Ingold-Prelog system to designation of stereochemistry (E/Z or R/S).
  • Learn many of the reactions of alkanes, alkenes, polyenes, alkynes, aromatic, carbonyl, and amine compounds, and close related species. Be able to predict reactions involving these functional groups.
  • Be able to solve problems employing spectroscopic methods including mass spectrometry, infrared and NMR spectroscopy
  • Understand the basic chemical and structural features of biomolecules, including lipids, carbohydrates, amino acids and proteins, and nucleic acids.
CHEM 9  COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES FOR Chem 9:
· Students will learn and apply basic techniques used in the organic laboratory for preparation,
purification and identification of organic compounds.
· Students will employ the major techniques used in organic chemistry laboratory for analyses
such as melting point determination, extraction, chromatography, infrared spectroscopy,
distillation and chemical characterization tests.
· Students will synthesize at least one organic compound will be synthesized and identify the
corresponding alteration in the functional groups.
· Students will correctly calculate reaction yield for relevant lab experiments.
· Students will analyze the given procedure of an experiment and suggest or recommend
improvements.
· Students will apply safety rules in the practice of laboratory investigations.
· Students will develop better understanding of the organic chemistry behind everyday
observations such as the action of soap, or application of color dyes on variety of fabrics.
CHEM 10

This course should provide students with sufficient understanding of the basic principles of elementary chemistry to have the necessary background for college chemistry (Chemistry 1A). You must sign up for one of the Lecture and one of the Activity sections.

CHEM 30A  

Student and Course Learning Objectives:General Education Course

This course meets the SJSU’s Core General Education requirements for Physical Sciences for Non-science majors as well as prepares science or undeclared majors for Chemistry 1A (recommended Chem 30A final course grade of “B” or better for success in Chem 1A). By completing this course, students should be able to:

1. Use the methods of science and knowledge derived from current scientific inquiry in physical science to question existing explanations.

  • Course activities that will meet this requirement are all of the laboratory experiments that begin with a question or statement relating to the purpose/objective of the lab and questions at the end of the lab to probe your understanding of your data and the relationship to the concepts studied. In addition, there will be class discussions of how scientific discoveries such as the atom and renewable energy resources were derived from scientific inquiry.

2. Demonstrate ways in which science influences and is influenced by complex societies, including political and moral issues.

  • The influence of science will be addressed in lectures where these

relationships can be made, such as in medicine and healthcare, environmental issues or the technological advances used to discover the structure of the atom. You will also have the opportunity to write one essay on a topic to be determined later in the course.

3. Use the methods of science, in which quantitative, analytical reasoning techniques are used.

Many of the labs and concepts require the use of quantitative and analytical reasoning techniques. For example, most of the labs require students to make observations, take measurements and use equations involving measured variables. In terms of reactions you will discover how balanced equations symbolically represent atoms and particles and a connection will be made to what you observe macroscopically.
CHEM 30B  

Student and Course Learning Objectives:General Education Course

This course meets the SJSU’s Core General Education requirements for Physical Sciences for Non-science majors as well as prepares science or undeclared majors for Chemistry 1A (recommended Chem 30A final course grade of “B” or better for success in Chem 1A). By completing this course, students should be able to:

1. Use the methods of science and knowledge derived from current scientific inquiry in physical science to question existing explanations.

  • Course activities that will meet this requirement are all of the laboratory experiments that begin with a question or statement relating to the purpose/objective of the lab and questions at the end of the lab to probe your understanding of your data and the relationship to the concepts studied. In addition, there will be class discussions of how scientific discoveries such as the atom and renewable energy resources were derived from scientific inquiry.

2. Demonstrate ways in which science influences and is influenced by complex societies, including political and moral issues.

  • The influence of science will be addressed in lectures where these

relationships can be made, such as in medicine and healthcare, environmental issues or the technological advances used to discover the structure of the atom. You will also have the opportunity to write one essay on a topic to be determined later in the course.

3. Use the methods of science, in which quantitative, analytical reasoning techniques are used.

Many of the labs and concepts require the use of quantitative and analytical reasoning techniques. For example, most of the labs require students to make observations, take measurements and use equations involving measured variables. In terms of reactions you will discover how balanced equations symbolically represent atoms and particles and a connection will be made to what you observe macroscopically.
CHEM 55  COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES FOR Chem 55
Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:
CLO #1 Perform accurate and precise analysis in the field of analytical
chemistry
CLO #2 He or she will be able to keep records of all performed analysis in the
manner which is required in modern analytical laboratory.
CLO #3 Student will be able to do statistical analysis and evaluate repeatability
of obtained results
CLO #4 Perform quantitative and qualitative analysis of known standards as
well as unknown samples.
CLO#5 Identify, properly use, and care for equipment and supplies used in
analytical laboratory
CLO#6 Identify the requirements for adequate protection of personnel form
solvents and materials used in the analysis.
CHEM 55 Lab COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES FOR Chem 55
Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:
CLO #1 Perform accurate and precise analysis in the field of analytical
chemistry
CLO #2 He or she will be able to keep records of all performed analysis in the
manner which is required in modern analytical laboratory.
CLO #3 Student will be able to do statistical analysis and evaluate repetability
of obtained results
CLO #4 Perform quantitative and qualitative analysis of known standards as
well as unknown samples.
CLO#5 Identify, properly use, and care for equipment and supplies used in
analytical laboratory
CLO#6 Identify the requirements for adequate protection of personnel form
solvents and materials used in the analysis.
CHEM 100W  Class meetings will include lectures, class discussions, student oral presentations, poster presentations, special presentations on the library, etc. in addition, library and written assignments will be involved, as well as reading assignments in the texts. Plagiarism and any other cheating will not be tolerated, leading to a minimum penalty of an F for the particular assignment and, given the proper circumstances, an F for the entire course, or further action as sanctioned by the University.
CHEM 112A  
  • Understanding the various ways organic chemical structures are depicted.
  • Drawing organic chemical structures from names (and vice-versa)
  • Naming Structures including stereoisomers and geometric isomers
  • Knowledge of the two models of bonding used in organic chemistry
  • Understanding the basic concepts of thermodynamics and kinetics as applied to organic chemistry
  • Understanding the concepts of acidity and basicity, pKa, Lewis acids, Lewis bases, electrophiles and nucleophiles as applied to organic chemistry
  • Use of ‘curly arrows’ to depict reaction mechanisms
  • Knowledge of the basic mechanisms of substitution and elimination (Sn1, Sn2, E1, E2, E1cb)
  • Basic reactions of alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, alkyl halides and aromatic compounds
CHEM 112B  

Demonstrate understanding of core concepts and to effectively solve problems in organic chemistry.

•An understanding and ability to apply all material covered in Chem 112A (McMurry Chapters 1 to 14)

•Appreciation for the nature and scope of organic chemistry.

•Application of key concepts from general chemistry including electronegativity, bonding (ionic and covalent), hybridzation of atomic orbitals, and molecular orbital theory to organic systems.

•Draw valence bond and Lewis dot structures for organic species, including formal charges and oxidation numbers.

•Draw structures for organic compounds in a variety of methods (including, but not limited to, line-bond, Lewis Dot, dash/wedge, Fisher, Haworth projections); show stereochemistry and regiochemistry accurately.

•Apply acid-base concepts to organic systems; predict ordering of acid or base strength; understand the roles of acids and bases in reaction mechanisms.

•Name the various forms of carbonyl-containing compounds, amines, carbohydrates, lipids, nucleic acids, amino acids and their various derivatives using systematic (IUPAC) nomenclature.

•Learn common names and acronyms for key chemicals and solvents.

•Understand the concept and definitions of aromaticity.

•Draw products and reaction mechanisms for many reactions including all aromatic compounds, carbonyl-containing compounds, amines, carbohydrates, amino acids, lipids.

•Recognize stereochemistry and be able to apply the Cahn-Ingold-Prelog system to designation of stereochemistry (E/Z, R/S, re/si).

•Apply stereochemical aspects to reaction mechanism.

•Understand the fundamentals of reaction kinetics and be able to apply to the determination

of reaction mechanism.

•Employ the reactions learned in designing multistep organic synthesis.

•Learn and be able to apply the material presented in Chapters 15 - 28 in the text (McMurry, 8th edition) as well as additional topics presented in lecture.   Knowledge and application of information presented in earlier chapters (Chapters 1 to 14) is also expected.

CHEM 113A

• Learn to practice safe laboratory techniques.

• Routinely perform stoichiometric calculations (limiting reagent, theoretical yield).

• Understand and be able to use the basic operations of an organic laboratory including gravity & vacuum filtration, liquid-liquid extraction, distillation, reflux, recrystallization, drying of solids and solutions, and the theories behind these techniques.

• Identify and assess the purity of organic compounds using analytical techniques like melting point, thin layer chromatography (TLC), IR (v.i.), NMR (v.i.), and gas chromatography.

• Deduce organic structure using spectroscopic methods: esp. infrared (IR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy; minor mention of mass spectra and ultraviolet spectra/visible (UV/vis).

            -Be able to deduce hydrogen deficiency index (HDI) from a molecular formula and use this                     in structure determination.

For NMR -Understand the fundamental theory of 1-dimensional proton NMR analysis; symmetry.

            -Understand the effect of structure on chemical shift and coupling constant.

            -Learn to calculate chemical shifts for substituted alkanes and aromatics using tables.

            -Be able to construct splitting diagrams (“trees”) and be able to measure

                        coupling constants from an NMR spectrum.

            -Be able to recognize and know how to test for exchangeable hydrogens in a molecule.

            -Be aware of the regions of the NMR spectrum where various key protons are found.

            -Be able to fully assign NMR spectra.

For IR -Be familiar with the principles behind IR spectroscopy.

            -Understand the factors that influence the strength and frequency of an IR peak.

            -Assign key peaks in an IR spectrum.

            -Be able to determine which peaks are most diagnostic in making an assignment

                        of structure using IR.

            -Be able to record an IR spectrum.                                                                                        

•   Develop the ability to follow a detailed procedure, and construct a flow diagram to illustrate it.

• Understand the theory behind the operations performed, as demonstrated by the ability to explain deviation from the theoretically optimum results (which is the usual case), and suggest improvements to the procedures employed.

• Understand and be able to reproduce for a related chemical system the detailed chemical mechanisms for all laboratory reactions employed.

• Learn to keep contemporaneous notes – writing down what you do and what you see directly in the lab notebook as you do it and see it, as you would in normal professional environments, in sufficient detail that another person not familiar with the particular experiment could reproduce your work. This last statement is the purpose of a notebook. It can be critical in certain situations.

CHEM 113B  •Demonstrate understanding of core concepts and to effectively solve problems
in organic chemistry.
•Mastering advanced laboratory techniques for manipulation of organic compounds
(synthesis, separation, purification)
•Characterization of organic compounds by physical and spectroscopic methods (see below)
•Use of infrared (IR), 1-D and 2-D proton NMR, and 13C NMR spectroscopies
to characterize organic molecules.
•Apply mass spectroscopy (exact mass, and fragmentation patterns) to organic structural analysis.
•Select conditions for GC analysis and analyze GC chromatographic data.
•Maintain useful contemporaneous notes of experimental procedures.
•Write original formal laboratory reports in ACS journal style.
•Locate scientific data as needed.
•Design experimental procedures for new reactions, and modify existing procedures as needed.
(deduce reasons for the success or failure of a procedure)
•Operate safely in the laboratory, and dispose of waste properly
CHEM 114
  • Identify unknown organic compounds using a combination of physical methods (including melting point, solubility), qualitative chemical tests, and spectroscopy (including mass spectrometry, infrared spectrometry, 1D and 2D proton and carbon NMR spectroscopy); be able to do this proficiently both by paper exercises and in lab work.
  • Be able to determine how to successfully separate and purify both by paper exercises and in lab work
  • Perform literature research to design an independent research project which can be conducted within the time and infrastructure framework of the course and facilities
  • Write a protocol for a research project, including safety issues (review MSDS for all chemical involved)
  • Conduct research in a safe and responsible manner
  • Perform the experimental protocol in lab, be able to troubleshoot when problems arise and devise “workarounds”
  • Keep an up to date laboratory notebook
  • Write formal written reports in the form of a manuscript (using the format of a Journal of Organic Chemistry manuscript)
  • Prepare and present an oral presentation (using Powerpoint) in a formal symposium setting
CHEM 120S  Specific course learning objectives: Credit for this course is earned by reading the prescribed materials and passing quizzes that are administered online, students will demonstrate competence in at least 80% of the following specific learning objectives:
a. become familiar with the Safety Ethic
b. learn basic laboratory rules and basic principles of lab safety
c. learn to access and interpret materials safety data sheets (MSDSs)
d. learn the SJSU Chemical Hygiene Plan
e. learn to recognize basic laboratory and chemical hazards
f. learn the vocabulary, signs, labels of chemical and laboratory safety
g. learn emergency and incident reporting procedures
h. learn certain procedures, practices and tools appropriate to working with hazardous chemicals
i. understand common chemical exposure routes, LD50 values, distinguish acute and chronic exposures
j. understand threshold limit values (TLVs), permissible (PELs) and short term exposure limits STELs
k. understand the physical nature of specific laboratory hazards
l. know the biological effects of and permissible exposures to certain chemicals
m. learn certain safety precaution techniques
CHEM 130A

Students will learn the structure and function of the major classes of biomolecules as well as the chemical and physical mechanisms of their action and the experimental basis by which these mechanisms are deduced.

CHEM 130B  

Students will learn about bioenergetics, the nature of a variety of metabolic pathways, the regulation of these pathways and the mechanisms by which regulation is accomplished. They will also acquire an understanding of the experimental basis by which these mechanisms have been deduced.

CHEM 130C

Students will learn about normal and abnormal cellular growth and mitosis control pathways, and the chemical mechanism of action of selected chemotherapeutic agents.

CHEM 131A  

Students will learn how to carry out independent experimental work in a laboratory setting while investigating a research problem, utilize appropriate instrumentation and techniques to accomplish this and communicate the results of the work in the form of a clearly written journal article.

CHEM 131B

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

LO(1) apply proper laboratory practices including safety, waste management, and record keeping

LO(2) use and understand modern biochemical techniques and instruments

LO(3) plan, design, and execute experiments based on biochemical literature

LO(4) interpret experimental results and draw reasonable conclusions

LO(5) communicate effectively through written and oral reports.

CHEM 132 Students will be able to:
SLO#1: Recognize all 20 common amino acids and understand the different levels of protein structure.
SLO#2: Utilize the equations governing enzyme kinetics, and recognize the structure of key enzyme
cofactors, including several vitamins.
SLO#3: Know the order of metabolic intermediates and the corresponding enzyme names for the pathways
of carbohydrate metabolism, the citric acid cycle, electron transport chain, lipid metabolism, and
protein metabolism.
SLO#4: Calculate the number of ATP molecules generated for a given nutrient.
CHEM 132L Students will be able to:
SLO#1: Become familiar with different volumetric measurements and use laboratory pipettors correctly.
SLO#2: Perform some enzyme assays.
SLO#3: Learn bioseparation techniques.
SLO#4: Use a spectrometer.
SLO#5: Keep an organized lab notebook, and write clear and concise lab reports.
CHEM 135  

The Course Learning Objectives for Chem 135 are as follows:

Students will learn about acid/base equilibrium and its relevance to biochemical systems, the structural features of amino acids and proteins, the kinetics and mechanisms of enzyme catalyzed reactions, the structural features of biomembranes and the manner in which they mediate the transport of solutes, and the nature and regulation of a variety of metabolic pathways.

CHEM 145

To develop the ability to predict the structures, and certain properties and reactivities of the elements and of many of their simpler ionic and covalent compounds. This will require enhanced understanding of atomic structure and bonding models, including molecular orbitals. These concepts are directly applicable to organic and biochemistry, and also to many aspects of biology, materials science, and environmental science.

CHEM 146  

The main student learning objectives for CHEM 146 students are as follows:

  • To be able to independently design, implement, and report the results of a semester-long research project, with appropriate guidance from the instructor as needed;
  • To demonstrate proficiency in literature searches and use of database resources as a tool for designing and implementing their semester-long project;
  • To be able to independently execute synthetic and analytical experimental procedures found in the scientific literature in physical and inorganic chemistry safely and efficiently;
  • To reinforce concepts previously learned in physical, analytical, and inorganic chemistry courses by applying them in a laboratory setting;
  • To recognize potential shortcomings in a scientific procedure and develop alternate plans in the face of unsuccessful procedures; and
  • To demonstrate the ability to present the results of a project, both in an oral presentation and in a written journal-style scientific paper.
CHEM 155  In the laboratory students will implement, document in a laboratory notebook and report their qualitative and quantitative chemical analyses. There will be two ‘major’ experiments and several short experiments. The major experiments will be largely designed by the students – by design I mean that the number of samples, the standard preparations and calibration methods will be the responsibility of the students. The first major experiment will have a formal report, with a discipline-specific writing component that includes abstract, introduction, results, discussion and references. This first experiment will be an atomic spectroscopic analysis of a vitamin tablet by flame atomic absorption (FAAS) and inductively coupled plasma emission spectrometry atomic emission (ICP-AES). The second major experiment will be the determination of caffeine and benzoic acid in Diet Coke by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) experiment. The second major experiment will have an abbreviated, “abstract plus results” format that will require calculation of results and interpretation in terms of statistics but not a full description of the experiment. The short reports will follow a format that is described in the lab notebook and will require planning, implementation, calculation, printout preparation and in some cases the answering of various questions. These experiments will be on the topics of ultraviolet-visible spectrometry (UV-VIS), Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR), gas chromatography with mass spectral detection (GC-MS) and fluorescence spectroscopy, and, time-permitting, Raman spectroscopy. The UV-VIS, FTIR and GC-MS experiments will be done using an unknown sample supplied by the instructor. A major goal of these experiments will be to attain a detailed and fundamental understanding of the measurement process and the instrument function.
CHEM 160  

The main student learning objectives for CHEM 160 students are as follows:

  • Students will explain and apply the concepts of thermodynamics, kinetics, quantum mechanics, and spectroscopy to chemical, physical, and biochemical systems.
  • Students will be able to derive essential mathematical relationships in thermodynamics, kinetics, quantum mechanics, and spectroscopy.
  • Students will apply essential mathematical relationships to chemical, physical, and biochemical problems, including chemical and biochemical reactions and phase equilibria.
  • Students will evaluate physical and chemical systems to determine how to control these systems.
CHEM 161A  

CLO #1   Students will be able to derive essential mathematical relationships in classical

                     thermodynamics, kinetics and electrochemistry.

CLO #2   Students will apply essential mathematical relationships to chemical and physical

                      problems, including chemical reactions and phase equilibria

CLO #3   Students will evaluate physical and chemical systems to determine how to control these

                     systems.

CHEM 161B  

CLO #1   Upon completion, the student should know how to interpret (and normalize) a wavefunction, calculate a probability using a wavefunction, calculate and interpret an expectation value, utilize and interpret the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle and understand and utilize the Superposition principle.

CLO #2 The student will apply the essential mathematical relationships to understand quantum mechanical models such as Particle in a Box, Harmonic Oscillator, and Rigid Rotor.

CLO #3   The student will know how to employ quantum mechanical principals and models to                

interpret topics in the hydrogen atom, polyelectronic atoms, and bonding .

CLO #4   Students will apply essential mathematical relationships to physical problems from group theory to understand molecular behavior and interpret vibrational spectra.

CHEM 162L

 The following table indicates the learning objectives for each of the exercises/experiments.
Exercise/Experiment
Nuclear Chemistry. In this exercise, students will measure the rate of nuclear decay of a short-lived isotope to determine a number of statistical and physical properties.


Kinetics of the Bromination of Acetone. In this experiment, students will measure the rate of reaction for the bromination of acetone in order to determine the rate law for the acid-catalyzed reaction.


The Joule-Thomson Effect. In this experiment, students will measure the Joule-Thomson coefficient for selected gasses and relate results to those predicted based on theoretical methods.


Heat Capacity Ratio for Gasses. In this experiment, students will determine γ, the ratio of Cp/Cv for several gasses using the speed of sound method. Results will be related to those predicted based on statistical thermodynamic predictions.
Enthalpy of Combustion. In this experiment, students will utilize bomb calorimetry to determine the enthalpy of combustion of a hydrocarbon.


Electronic Spectrum of I2. In this experiment, students will record and analyze an electronic transition of I2 in order to determine the dissociation energy of the molecule in both ground and excited electronic states.


Rotation-Vibration Spectroscopy of HCl and DCl. In this experiment, students will record the 1-0 infrared bands of HCl and DCl and analyze the spectra for structural and energetic data for these molecules.


Vibrational Spectroscopy and Greenhouse Warming Potentials of Polyatomic Molecules. In this experiment we will examine the greenhouse warming potential of a variety of polyatomic gasses based on the overlap of their infrared absorption spectra with the earth’s infrared emission spectrum.

CHEM 184

1) To familiarize students with advanced degree programs (PhD) in the fields of Science and Engineering including applications, requirements, GRE testing, etc.

2) To help students apply to graduate programs.

3) To help students identify and apply for research programs on and off campus.

4) To provide interactions between students and graduate schools.

5) To bring together students with similar educational goals.

CHEM 213 Students will learn about synthetically useful transformations including oxidations, reductions, enolate reactions, percicyclic reactions, organometallic reactions, and reactions of electron deficient species. The emphasis will be on developing a mechanistic understanding of selectivity and synthetic strategy.
CHEM 218  • To learn about the common organometallic reactions and to be able to draw reasonable reaction mechanisms.
• To learn about the applications of organometallic chemistry, including catalytic reactions for organic synthesis and polymerization.
• To identify the basic concept, terms, and important events in the development of organometallic chemistry.
• To learn methods, including spectroscopy techniques, used to determine the structure of organometallic complexes and to probe reaction mechanism.
• To learn about cutting-edge single-molecule tools to study organometallic reactions.
• To develop the skill to critically read primary literature, and to interpret experimental observations.
•To develop an appreciation for the scope, diversity, and application of organometallic chemistry.
CHEM 231 Students will learn about normal and abnormal cellular growth and mitosis control pathways, and the chemical mechanism of action of selected chemotherapeutic agents.
CHEM 236

(1) To become familiar with many of the biophysical techniques used in research and industry for
analyzing the structure and function of macromolecules, especially proteins; (2) To appreciate the
role of water structure in biological interactions; (3) to read and critique multiple journal articles
from the scientific literature; (4) to improve written and verbal communication skills as applied to
topics in biophysical chemistry.

CHEM 237

• To recognize the importance of inorganic molecules in supporting organic biological systems.
• To learn about how metal ions function as catalytic and structural centers in biological systems.
• To learn about the metal ion transport and storage within cells and how any malfunction can result in various
diseases.
• To gain insight into cutting edge developments that utilize metal ions for medical purposes.
• To learn methods, including spectroscopy techniques, used to study metal ions in biological systems.
• To develop the skill to critically read primary literature, and to interpret experimental observations.
•To develop an appreciation for the structure and function of metal ions in the biological systems and how
chemists aim to mimic them.

CHEM 250  Program Learning Objectives #1 - To demonstrate an advanced understanding of selected
topics in chemistry.
Program Learning Objectives #2 - To demonstrate information literacy skills for acquiring
knowledge of chemistry, both as a student and as a life-long learner.
Program Learning Objectives #3 - To demonstrate an understanding of experimentation,
observation and data analysis, and their application to defined questions in chemistry.
Program Learning Objectives #4 - To demonstrate a familiarity with available
instrumentation for conducting specific scientific research.
Program Learning Objectives #5 - To communicate effectively, verbally and written, for the
purposes of conveying chemical information to both professional scientists and to the public.
CHEM 285 Increased familiarity with modern research topics in chemistry.