Faculty Publications

 

Alphabetical Listings of Authors

  Noelle Brada-Williams
Paul Douglass
Karen English
Kate Evans
Katherine D. Harris
Kelly A. Harrison
Donald Keesey
Revathi Krishnaswamy
Samuel Maio
Cathleen Miller
Linda Mitchell
Neli Moody
Scott Rice
Avantika Rohatgi
Claudia Salewske
Susan Shillinglaw
Nick Taylor
Mary Warner


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Journals

  Reed Magazine
Steinbeck Studies


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Publications

 

Noelle Brada-Williams

Crossing Oceans: Reconfiguring American Literary Studies in the Pacific Rim

Crossing Oceans: Reconfiguring American Literary Studies in the Pacific Rim
(Hong Kong University Press, 2004)

With the increasing globalization of culture, American literature has become a significant body of text for classrooms outside of the United States. Bringing together essays from a wide range of scholars in a number of countries, including China, Japan, Korea, Singapore, and the United States, Crossing Oceans focuses on strategies for critically reading and teaching American literature, especially ethnic American literature, within the Asia Pacific region. This book will be an important tool for scholars and teachers from around the globe who desire fresh perspectives on American literature from a variety of national contexts.

See also Asian American Literature: Sources for Research.

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Paul Douglass

The Whole Disgraceful Truth: Selected Letters of Lady Caroline Lamb

The Whole Disgraceful Truth: Selected Letters of Lady Caroline Lamb
(Palgrave Macmillan, 2006)

Lady Caroline Lamb was described by her lover, Lord Byron, as having a heart like a “little volcano” and as “the cleverest most agreeable, absurd, amiable, perplexing, dangerous fascinating little being that lives now or ought to have lived 2000 years ago.” She wrote witty and revealing letters to fellow authors like Lady Morgan, William Godwin, Robert Malthus, and Amelia Opie, and to her publishers John Murray and Henry Colburn, to her cousins Hart, Georgiana, and Harrio, as well as to her mother, husband, son, and lovers. In those letters she told her correspondents what she admitted was “the whole disgraceful truth” of her drug and alcohol addictions, her affairs with Sir Godfrey Vassal Webster, Lord Byron, and Michael Bruce, her jealousy of her cousin Georgiana (whom William Lamb had “adored” before proposing to Caroline), but also of her efforts to make a happy life for her mentally retarded, epileptic son, Augustus, and her determination to become a respected writer of fiction, poetry, and songs.

   See also Caro: The LadyCaroline Lamb Website

Lady Caroline Lamb: A Biography

Lady Caroline Lamb: A Biography
(Palgrave Macmillan, 2004)

Lady Caroline Lamb, among Lord Byron's many lovers, stands out—vilified, portrayed as a self-destructive nymphomaniac—her true story has never been told. Now, Paul Douglass provides the first unbiased treatment of a woman whose passions and independence were incompatible with the age in which she lived. Taking into account a traumatic childhood, Douglass explores Lamb's so-called "erotomania" and tendency towards drug abuse and madness—problems she and Byron had in common. In this portrait, she emerges as a person who sacrificed much for the welfare of a sick child, and became an artist in her own right. Douglass illuminates her novels and poetry, her literary friendships, and the lifelong support of her husband and her publisher, John Murray.

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Karen English

Notes of Conversations, 1848-1875

Notes of Conversations, 1848-1875
(Fairleigh Dickinson University Press, 2007)

Notes of Conversations, 1848-1875 is a volume of transcripts of conversations conducted by the nineteenth-century American philosopher and educator A. Bronson Alcott at various locations in New England and the Midwest. The transcripts have been copied from unpublished manuscripts in the Alcott collection at Harvard University and Concord Free Library, as well as published contemporary articles in The Radical, New York Tribune, and Chicago Tribune. Gathered in this volume, Alcott's transcripts vividly reflect American intellectual concerns from the years preceding the Civil War through the beginning of the Gilded Age.

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Kate Evans

Complementary Colors

Complementary Colors
(Vanilla Heart Publishing, 2009)

What happens when a 31-year-old straight woman falls in love with a lesbian? Gwen Sullivan must ask herself who she is and what she wants from life. This leads her to make one of the most important decisions of her life.

For the May Queen

For the May Queen
(Vanilla Heart Publishing, 2008)

It is 1981 and 17-year-old Norma Rogers' parents drop her off at the college dorms. Soon, Norma finds herself drunk and nearly naked with three strangers. Many tumultuous events take Norma through an array of troubles, pleasures, and thrills: from drug use and ominous encounters with strangers, to rowdy parties and road trips, to queer coming-out surprises. Ultimately Norma comes to see that there are many ways to live and love.

Like All We Love

Like All We Love (poems)
(Q Press, June 2006)

Like All We Love is filled with intense, provocative, and at times humorous poems that explore sexuality, mortality and desire.

Rethinking Preparation for Content Area Teaching: The Reading Apprenticeship Approach

Rethinking Preparation for Content Area Teaching: The Reading Apprenticeship Approach
with Jane Braunger, David M. Donahue & Tomas Galguera
(Jossey-Bass, 2005)

Rethinking Preparation for Content Area Teaching illustrates how to effectively incorporate the Reading Apprenticeship instructional model into secondary teacher education programs. Arguing that teacher education programs need to foster a broader understanding of adolescent literacy, the authors show how Reading Apprenticeship can serve to strengthen literacy instruction.

Negotiating the Self: Identity, Sexuality and Emotion in Learning to Teach

Negotiating the Self: Identity, Sexuality and Emotion in Learning to Teach
(Routledge, 2002)

Kate Evans' book is the first ever study of lesbian and gay pre-service teachers. It includes experiences as a student of teaching in the university, as well as teachers or assistant teachers in public schools. Integrating personal stories from interviews with broader global theories on notions of identity and queer theory, she gives a moving and insightful look at the positions these teachers hold. Her study provides for thought-provoking debate on the negotiation of self and subjectivity and gives valuable perspective to this growing field in education.

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Katherine D. Harris

Forget Me Not: A Hypertextual Archive of Ackermann's 19th-Century Literary Annual

Forget Me Not: A Hypertextual Archive of Ackermann's 19th-Century Literary Annual
(Poetess Archive, Romantic Circles, NINES, 2006)

http://www.orgs.muohio.edu/anthologies/FMN/

A digital rendering of textual, contextual and (select) content from several volumes of the first British-published literary annual, Forget Me Not. This annual, published by Rudolf Ackermann & Co. 1823-1847, began the literary phenomenon and was published annually for twenty-four consecutive years. Its longevity was rivaled by only a few other British titles; however, many scholars overlook it (and Ackermann's) significance to nineteenth-century popular culture, publishing trends and literary production. This Archive provides access to both the bibliographical elements and content of this particular annual. Full text of all volumes will be added over the next five years.

The Forgotten Gothic: Short Stories from British Literary Annuals, 1823-1831 
(zittaw press, 2012)   link to Amazon

This astonishing collection of 95 rare Gothic tales from British Literary Annuals tales takes us further than perhaps eighteenth or nineteenth-century scholars are comfortable with- to the Gothic's afterlife. Once touted as a literary "dead zone" -the Annuals of the1820s and 30s are unexpectedly populated with dozens of terrifying and horrific Gothic tales. A groundbreaking collection, Forgotten Gothic, illustrates the continued development of the Gothic genre even after its supposed death in 1820.

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Kelly A. Harrison

West Winds Centennial

West Winds Centennial
(California Writers Club, 2010)

This collection of stories, memoirs, and poems by members of the California Writers Club celebrates the clubs centennial. Founded in 1909, the CWC is one of the nation's oldest professional club for writers. Early honorary members included Jack London, George Sterling, John Muir, Joaquin Miller, and the first California poet laureate, Ina Coolbrith. The first West Winds, a hardcover collection of fiction, was published in 1914 and illustrated by California artists. This is the fifth West Winds. As a nonprofit, the CWC educates writers of all levels and disciplines in the craft of writing and in the marketing of their work. CWC branches hold regular meetings, workshops, and conferences with speakers and opportunities for networking with writers and publishing professionals.

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Donald Keesey

Contexts for Criticism

Contexts for Criticism
(McGraw-Hill, 2002)

Contexts for Criticism introduces readers to the essential issues of literary interpretation. The text includes three complete works: Keats's "Ode on a Grecian Urn," Melville's Benito Cereno, and Charlotte Perkins Gilman's The Yellow Wallpaper. These texts - plus Shakespeare's The Tempest - are examined through seven fundamental critical theories: Historical (Author as Context and Culture as Context), Formal, Reader-Response, Mimetic, Intertextual, and Poststructural.

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Revathi Krishnaswamy

Postcolonial and the Global

Postcolonial and the Global
Edited by Revathi Krishnaswamy, John C. Hawley, John C. Hawley
(University of Minnesota Press, 2007)

This interdisciplinary work brings the humanities and social sciences into dialogue by examining issues such as globalized capital, discourses of antiterrorism, and identity politics. Essayists from the fields of postcolonial studies and globalization theory address the ethical and pragmatic ramifications of opposing interpretations of these issues and, for the first time, seek common ground.

Effeminism: The Economy of Colonial Desire

Effeminism: The Economy of Colonial Desire
(University of Michigan Press, 1999)

A fascinating study of "the inevitable intimacy between colonizer and colonized," Effeminism: The Economy of Colonial Desire attempts to chart the flow of colonial desire by examining the complex encodings of fears, fascinations, and anxieties in the works of British writers in India. The author examines the works of Flora Annie Steel, Rudyard Kipling, and E. M. Forster, and finds their works to be deeply implicated in the politics of colonial rule and anticolonial resistance. Krishnaswamy refuses to characterize the colonial encounter in terms of unchanging and monolithic Manichean oppositions, repeatedly drawing attention to fissures, contradictions, and slippages that attend the production of English manliness and Indian effeminacy. By restoring both the political in the unconscious and the unconscious in the political, the book proposes to understand colonialism in terms of historical failure, ideological inadequacy, and political contention.

See also Globalizing Literary Studieswebsite.

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Samuel Maio

Creating Another Self: Voice in Modern American Personal Poetry

Creating Another Self: Voice in Modern American Personal Poetry
(Truman State UP, 2005)

Creating Another Self makes two significant literary assertions. First, that all first-person voice poetry necessarily involves a "masking" of some kind; and second, that all personal poetry falls into one of three masking modes: the confessional, the persona, and the self-effacing. Samuel Maio supports these claims with an in-depth analysis of the work of representative poets, three for each mode: Robert Lowell, James Wright, and Anne Sexton (confessional); John Berryman, Weldon Kees, and Galway Kinnell (persona); and Mark Strand, Charles Simic, and David Ignatow (self-effacing). Further, the book draws on the work of several newer poets such as Garrett Hongo and Jim Barnes to suggest that personal poetry has had a far reaching influence on 20th century poetry. A work of theoretical criticism, and not a survey of personal poets, "Creating Another Self" suggests that contemporary personal poetry is a distinctive phase begun in the 1950s and coming to a close in the 1990s. The book is an important work for scholars of American literature and for creative writers.

The Burning of Los Angeles: Poems

The Burning of Los Angeles: Poems
(Truman State UP, 1997)

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Cathleen Miller

The Birdhouse Chronicles: Surviving the Joys of Country Life

The Birdhouse Chronicles: Surviving the Joys of Country Life
(Lyons Press, 2004)

In The Birdhouse Chronicles, internationally bestselling author Cathleen Miller offers a funny and wise account of how she and her husband, Kerby, abandoned their San Francisco advertising careers to make a radical new life for themselves in a one-hundred-year-old Pennsylvania farmhouse located in the middle of an Amish cornpatch. Part memoir, part nature writing, and part old-house-restoration journal, this wonderfully intimate narrative brings home all the humor, exhilaration, and disappointment of pursuing a realer, "simpler" life in the country. Miller sprang from a rural background, and she's run from her roots during most of her adult life, but in Zion, Pa., she makes a gratifying, if not dubious, peace with her past.

Wild Writing Women: Stories of World Travel

Wild Writing Women: Stories of World Travel
with Lisa Alpine, Pamela Michael, Christina Phillips, Carla King, Alison Wright
(Globe Pequot Press, 2002)

Wild Writing Women: Stories of World Travel is an anthology from a remarkable writers' group. The WWW - a gathering of twelve women - travel the globe, returning as often as they can to share their tales of adventure. Through these pages you will journey alongside each author, traveling through China on a motorcycle, playing with fire at a volcano's edge in Hawaii, experiencing the supernatural in Scotland, or falling in love in Moscow. Life's adventures are expressed here with sensitivity and verve, providing a terrific read that is sure to become a favorite of book groups, armchair travelers, and wild women everywhere.

Desert Flower: The Extraordinary Journal of a Desert Nomad

Desert Flower: The Extraordinary Journal of a Desert Nomad
with Waris Dirie
(Harper Collins, 1999)

Waris Dirie leads a double life -- by day, she is an international supermodel and human rights ambassador for the United Nations; by night, she dreams of the simplicity of life in her native Somalia and the family she was forced to leave behind. Desert Flower, her intimate and inspiring memoir, is a must-read for anyone who has ever wondered about the beauty of African life, the chaotic existence of a supermodel, or the joys of new motherhood. Desert Flower was published simultaneously in eleven languages throughout the world and is currently being produced as a feature film by Rocket Pictures UK.

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Linda Mitchell

Portraits of Medieval Women: Family, Marriage and Social Relations in Thirteenth Century England

Portraits of Medieval Women: Family, Marriage and Social Relations in Thirteenth Century England
(Palgrave MacMillan, 2003)

Although numerous studies of medieval women and a number of biographies of medieval queens and noblewomen have appeared in recent years, comparatively few studies have sought to combine biographical and prosopographical approaches in order to develop portraits of specific women in order to highlight different life experiences of medieval women. The individual chapters can be read as separate histories of their specific subjects as well as case studies which together provide a coherent picture of the medieval English noblewoman.

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Neli Moody

After Altamira: Poems

After Altamira: Poems
(Ishmael Reed Publishing Company, 2006)

Every place we have lived, we have left evidence of our humanity. One such place is the cave paintings found in parts of Europe. The title poem is about those paintings and sets the tone for this collection. This collection explores concepts of identity, civilization, art, spirituality and community. In these poems, ranging from topics as diverse as boxing and King Kong, the Book of Kells and slavery, Moody looks for the significance of language and symbol, of discourse and intercourse, of silence and sound. A poem should be a house with many doors.

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 Scott Rice

It Was a Dark and Stormy Night: The Second Coming

It Was a Dark and Stormy Night: The Second Coming
(The Friday Project, 2007)

The Bulwer-Lytton Fiction Contest is a tongue-in-cheek contest that takes place annually where entrants are invited to compose the opening sentence to the worst of all possible novels. Attracting up to 10,000 entries every year, the competition spawns an embarrassment of dire fiction that is both horrifying and hilarious to read.

It Was a Dark and Stormy Night collects and presents the worst of this bad fiction in one, stunningly awful collection.

Dark and Stormy Rides Again: The Best

Dark and Stormy Rides Again: The Best
from the Bulwer-Lytton Contest
(Penguin)

This latest collection celebrates Bulwer-Lytton's famously awful opening in Paul Clifford (1830): "It was a dark and stormy night; the rain fell in torrents--except at occasional intervals, when it was checked by a violent gust of wind which swept up the streets (for it is in London that our scene lies), rattling along the housetops, and fiercely agitating the scanty flame of the lamps that struggled against the darkness." The contest encourages entrants to produce the best worst sentence in homage to this lengthy line.

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Avantika Rohatgi

 

Global Rights and Perceptions
(University Readers, 2012)

In Global Rights and Perceptions students read from a wide variety of original sources—foreign policy journals, non-fiction books, medical journals, and current affairs magazines on how human rights are currently being violated through practices such as human trafficking, female genital mutilation, organ trade, and female feticide. This varied exposure gives students several gateways through which to approach complex social issues, think and write about them with awareness and engagement. Based on the premise that students must be pulled away from a highly commercial, digitally perfect present, and encouraged to intelligently and passionately examine an imperfect world with a view to changing it, the book provides a well-rounded education on global rights, and the lack thereof, in our modern world. 

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Claudia Salewske

Gilroy

Gilroy
(Arcadia Publishing, 2003)

Located along the old El Camino Real, at the crossroads of the Pacheco and Hecker Pass highways, Gilroy is surrounded by some of the last of Santa Clara County's rich farmland. In addition to its successful lumbering and cigar-manufacturing enterprises, vast cattle ranches, and thriving hot springs resorts of yesteryear, Gilroy is known as "The Garlic Capital of the World." From the early Ohlone settlements, through the vibrant Rancho era and post "gold-fever" boom, to its world-famous Garlic Festival of present day, the book illustrates Gilroy's rich history in more than 200 images drawn from the archives of the Gilroy Museum and the albums of pioneer families. The stories that accompany these photos provide an engaging perspective of this unique and aromatic city at the southern end of Silicon Valley.

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Susan Shillinglaw

A Journey into Steinbeck's California

A Journey into Steinbeck's California
(Roaring Forties Press, 2006)

This part art book, part biography, and part travel guide offers insight into how landscapes and townscapes influenced John Steinbeck's creative process and how, in turn, his legacy has influenced modern California. Various types of readers will appreciate the information in this guideÑliterary pilgrims will learn more about the state featured so prominently in Steinbeck's work, tourists can visit the same buildings that he lived in and wrote about, and historians will appreciate the engrossing perspective on daily life in early 20th-century California. Offering an entirely new perspective on Steinbeck and the people and places that he brought to life in his writing, readers will find delight in this depiction of the symbiotic relationship between an author and his favorite places.

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Nick Taylor

The Disagreement

The Disagreement
(Simon and Schuster, 2008)

“In this dazzling debut novel, a young Virginia medical student must choose between family and ambition in the crucible of the American Civil War. Author Nick Taylor arrives on the literary scene like a cross between Stephen Crane and Scott FitzgeraldÐwith the sensibility of Charles Frazier. Seductive, authentic, and unforgettable, The Disagreement is an instant classic.”-Ian Caldwell, author of The Rule of Four

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Mary Warner

Adolescents in the Search for Meaning: Tapping the Powerful Resource of Story

Adolescents in the Search for Meaning: Tapping the Powerful Resource of Story
(Scarecrow Press, 2006)

As is painfully evident from the reports of school shootings, gang violence, and adolescent suicide, many teens live troubled lives. Even those who live a "normal" life are confronted by some of the challenges adults face. However, few of them have the same resources as adults for surviving such challenges. In addition, teens are also engaged in establishing independence and finding their identities. Building on the idea that "story" is a powerful source of meaning, particularly those stories that resonate with our own lives, Mary Warner suggests that the stories of other young adults offer a resource yet to be fully tapped. As such, readers are provided with insight into the young adult perspective from the results of a survey of over 1400 teens and through feedback from authors of young adult literature.

 


 

Journals

 

Reed Magazine

Reed Magazine: A Journal of Poetry and Prose

San Jose State University's Literary Magazine featuring submissions of original poetry and short stories from across the nation. Reed Magazine is one of the oldest student publications west of the Mississippi. In its earlier incarnations it was called El Portal. Reed was first numbered by year and volume in 1946. At the time, the magazine was put together by SJSU's literary society, Pegasus, with help from the Associated Student Body. The magazine continues to be compiled and edited by students in the Department of English & Comparative Literature programs.

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Steinbeck Studies

Steinbeck Studies is the authorized publication on the life and works of John Steinbeck. It publishes scholarly articles, essays, photographs, notes, book and performance review, and contemporary references about the author. Manuscripts are subject to blind peer review. Steinbeck Studies is issued twice yearly and includes a membership in the Steinbeck Society. Members will be informed of panels at the American Literature Association as well as events sponsored by the Center for Steinbeck Studies and the National Steinbeck Center.

  Martha Heasley CoxCenter for SteinbeckStudies