Lynne Trulio

Lynne Trulio

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Professor

Ph.D., Ecology, University of California at Davis
Phone: (408) 924-5445
Environmental Studies Main Phone (for appointments): (408) 924-5450
Lynne.Trulio@sjsu.edu

Course Webpage

 

Research Interests

Conservation of Rare Species, especially Burrowing Owls; Environmental Restoration; Wetlands Ecology; Recreation and Management Impacts on Wildlife

 

Courses Taught

Introduction to Environmental Issues; Environmental Impact Assessment; Advanced Impact Assessment; Environmental Restoration; Advanced Restoration; Globalization and the Environment; Senior Seminar; Graduate Proposal Writing

 

Biography

Lynne Trulio graduated from the University of California, Davis in 1988 with a Ph.D. in Ecology. Her research investigated the behavioral ecology of ground squirrels. She did her undergraduate work in biology at Goucher College in Towson, MD. Before joining the faculty of San José State University in 1991, she worked as the staff scientist for the Mountain Lion Preservation Foundation in Sacramento, CA and then as the ecologist for a region park in Mountain View, CA. Lynne teaches a range of undergraduate and graduate courses. She is the faculty advisor for the Environmental Resource Center and has been the Department Chair from 2001–2005 and 2008–2013. She was the Lead Scientist for the South Bay Salt Pond Restoration Project during its planning phase (2003–2009) and continued with the project as a researcher studying public access and wildlife.

 

Current Research

Dr. Trulio investigates human impacts on species and their habitats in human-dominated landscapes, and seeks effective methods to mitigate or eliminate those impacts. Specific research includes the ecology and protection of the western burrowing owl in California, restoration of tidal salt marshes in the San Francisco Bay, and the effects of recreation on wildlife. Dr. Trulio enthusiastically supports graduate students who conduct science and social science research on species preservation, especially in California's urban landscapes.