Glac Best Global Leadership Research Awards

Dr. Rachel Clapp Smith
Dr. Rachel Clapp Smith

Dr. Ming (Lily) Li
Dr. Ming (Lily) Li

Dr. Karen Lokkesmoe
Dr. Karen Lokkesmoe

In keeping with San Jose State University's Global Leadership Advancement Center's mission “to advance, foster and disseminate cutting-edge knowledge on global leadership and its development,” it is our great pleasure to announce our first annual research awards.

The winner of the Best Global Leadership Dissertation Award is “Global Mindset Development During Cultural Transitions” by Dr. Rachel Clapp-Smith. Her dissertation committee was chaired by Dr. Fred Luthans at the University of Nebraska. Dr. Clapp-Smith's dissertation, one of the first empirical studies to study the process of global mindset development, used culturally appropriate behavior as the outcome variable. A path model showed a strong fit among cultural self-awareness, cognitive complexity, and cultural intelligence, but positivity and suspending judgment did not interact or mediate as hypothesized. Dr. Clapp-Smith is currently Assistant Professor of Leadership at the Calumet School of Management at Purdue University.

The runners-up for this award are Dr. Ming (Lily) Li and Dr. Karen Lokkesmoe. “An Examination of the Antecedents of Cultural Intelligence” was written by Dr. Li Her dissertation was chaired by Dr. Aidan Kelly at University College Dublin. Her external advisor was Dr. William Mobley. Dr Li tested three antecedents of cultural intelligence - personality, international experience and learning and confirms that cultural intelligence is a matter of both nature and nurture. Dr. Li is currently on the faculty at the ESC Rennes School of Business in France.

Dr. Lokkesmoe wrote “A Grounded Theory Study of Effective Global Leadership Development Strategies: Perspectives From Brazil, India, and Nigeria.” Her dissertation chair was Dr. R. Michael Paige at the University of Minnesota. Dr. Lokkesmoe's dissertation examined “conceptualizations of global leadership, the skills required to lead effectively in global contexts, and recommended strategies for developing capacity from a developing country perspective.” Her research culminated in an integrated global leadership development model. Dr. Lokkesmoe is currently an adjunct professor at Augsburg College.

All three dissertations represent solid contributions to the field.

The winner of the Best Global Leadership Article Award is “Preferred Leadership Prototypes of Male and Female Leaders in 27 Countries” by Lori Paris (CSU-Bakersfield), Jon Howell and Peter Dorfman both of New Mexico State University - Las Cruces), and Paul Hanges (University of Maryland). Using a 27-country subsample of the GLOBE data set, the researchers found that the preferred leadership prototypes held by male and female leaders vary by gender, and that the prototype differences also varied across countries, cultures, and particularly industries. Given prior research on gender differences in leadership, it is not surprising that female leaders generally valued participative, team oriented and charismatic prototypes more than male leaders. Both male and female leaders, however, equally valued the humane-oriented leadership prototype, which might call into question the “feminine leadership advantage.”

We'd like to thank all the researchers who submitted their work and acknowledge our panel of judges, shown below, who are well-known experts in the field of global leadership.

  • Dr. Allan Bird,, Darla and Frederick Brodsky Trustee Professor in Global Business, College of Business Administration, Northeastern University

  • Dr. Mark Mendenhall, J. Burton Frierson Chair of Excellence in Business Leadership, University of Tennessee, Chattanooga

  • Dr. Martha Maznevski, MBA Program Director, IMD

  • Dr. Guenter Stahl, Vienna University of Economics and Business and INSEAD