Ruma Chopra

chopra

Ph.D.

University of California, Davis (2008)


Office

DMH 217

Email

ruma.chopra@sjsu.edu

Phone

408-924-5515

Web

www.rumachopra.com

Professor


Research Interests

Environment and race in the early modern era; slavery and labor migrations in world history; war and society in the American Revolution.

Books

Between God and Darwin (Columbia University Press, under contract).

Almost Home: Maroons between Slavery and Freedom in Jamaica, Nova Scotia, and Sierra Leone (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2018). 

Choosing Sides: Loyalists in Revolutionary America (Rowman and Littlefield Press, 2013).

Unnatural Rebellion: Loyalists in New York City during the Revolution (University of Virginia Press, 2011).

Fellowships

Hodson Trust-JCB Library Fellowship, 2019-2020
Folger Shakespeare Library, 2019-2020
Munich Centre for Global History, 2019
Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society, 2019
Max Planck Institute for the Study of Religious and Ethnic Diversity, 2018
Social Science Research Council, 2017
Gilder Lehrman Institute, New York City, 2016

Essays

“Rethinking the Historiography of Coolie Integration in British Caribbean Cities,” MMG Working Paper 19-01 (Göttingen, Germany: Max Planck Institute for the Study of Religious and Ethnic Diversity, 2019).

“Leaving Nova Scotia: Sierra Leone and Free Black People, 1792–1800” in Karly Kehoe and Michael Vance (eds), Reappraisals of British Colonization in Atlantic Canada (University of Edinburgh Press, 2019).

“The Royalist Maroons of Jamaica in the British Atlantic World, 1740–1800,” in Varia História (Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, 2019).

“Post-War Loyalist Hopes: ‘To Be Parts and Not Dependencies of the Empire,’” in R. Brannon and J.S. Moore (eds) Loyalty and Revolution: Essays in Honor of Robert M. Calhoon (University of South Carolina Press, 2019).

“‘Wayward Humours’ and ‘Perverse Disputings’: Exiled Blacks and the Foundation of Sierra Leone, 1787–1800,” in B.N. Lawrance and N.R. Carpenter (eds) Africans in Exile: Mobility, Law, and Identity, Past and Present, (Indiana University Press, 2018).

“Maroons and Mi’kmaq in Nova Scotia: 1796–1800,” in Acadiensis: Journal of the History of the Atlantic Region XLVI, no. 1 (Winter/Spring 2017): 5–23.

“Loyalist Women during the Revolutionary Era,” in T.A. Foster (ed) Women in Early America (New York University Press, 2015).

Invited Talks, 2016–2019

University of California, Davis, “Why did Slaves Rebel?”

Obama Institute for Transnational American Studies, Mainz, Germany, “Environment and Identity in the Early Modern World”

Max Planck Institute for the Study of Religious and Ethnic Diversity, Göttingen, Germany, “Enlightenment, Empire, and Environment”

Royal Society of Canada, “Thinking Historically about Refugees: Loyalists and Maroons in the Eighteenth Century.”

David Library of the American Revolution, “Maroons in the Age of Slavery”

University of Pennsylvania, “The Jamaican Maroons and the Meanings of Migration”

Yale University, “Popular Royalism in Jamaica”

University of Edinburgh, “Not Slaves: East Indians in Jamaica”