Faculty Publications


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READER/COMMENTATOR: “THE TOUGHEST BEAT” BY JOSHUA PAGE

Author(s):


Alessandro De Giorgi, Ph.D.

Publishing information:


June 7th, 2012 | Reader/Commentator: Law & Society Association Annual Meeting, Honolulu, HI.

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 BUILDING A SOCIOLOGY OF CRIMMIGRATION: SECURITIZATION IN MODERN TIMES

Author(s):


Alessandro De Giorgi

Publishing information:


June 7th, 2012 | Discussant: Law & Society Association Annual Meeting, Honolulu, HI.

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 RETURNING TO THE HOMELAND: THE MIGRATORY PATTERNS BETWEEN BRAZIL AND JAPAN FOR JAPANESE-BRAZILIANS

Author(s):


Dr. Yoko Baba and Dr. Claudio Vera Sanchez

Migration to well-off countries has been well documented. However, the reasons why migrants return to their home countries, which often face severe economic disadvantages, are examined less frequently. The return migration of Japanese-Brazilians (Brazilian citizens of ethnic Japanese descent) who migrate to Japan and return again to Brazil has not been studied to any great extent. To understand the factors associated with Japanese-Brazilians’ return migration, using Gmelch’s (1983) model of push and pull factors, we examined what motivated Japanese-Brazilian migrant laborers to return to Brazil from Japan. With a mixed method including in-person interviews, a total of n=47 Brazilian migrants to Japan were sampled in São Paulo, Brazil. The present examination resulted in a pattern similar to the one Gmelch (1983) observed in his study on Irish and Newfoundlander return migrants. In the current study, pull factors were more important than push factors in terms of repatriation. Personal and social pull factors were stronger reasons compelling migrants return to Brazil than were economic or familial factors. Nevertheless, familial and economic reasons were also reported as important motivators for returning to Brazil in our interviews. Limitations are also discussed. 

Publishing information:

May 7th, 2012 | Journal of International and Global Studies, 2012, 3(2): 1-31.

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TRAVELS IN THE SOCIOLOGY OF PUNISHMENT

 Author(s):

Alessandro De Giorgi, Ph.D.

Publishing information:


April 26th, 2012 | Paper presented at the Center for Applied Research on Human Services/College of Applied Sciences and Arts Research Forum, San Jose State University

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PUNISHMENT AND POLITICAL ECONOMY

Author(s):


Alessandro De Giorgi

Publishing information:


April 19th, 2012 | The SAGE Handbook of Punishment and Society (2012). Editors, Jonathan Simon and Richard Sparks

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SAN FRANCISCO’S ARREST RATES OF AFRICAN AMERICANS FOR DRUG FELONIES WORSENS

Author(s):


William Armaline and Mike Males

The following publication details a 40+ year pattern of San Francisco’s racially discriminatory arrest practices against African Americans, which recently increased in intensity. Specifically, the publication finds:

African Americans experienced felony drug arrest rates 19 times higher than other races in San Francisco, and 7.3 times higher than African Americans elsewhere in California.

San Francisco’s explosion in drug felony arrests of African Americans, during the 1995-2009 period, did not occur elsewhere in the state, nor for other racial categories in the city.

The city’s African American female youth account for over 40% of the felony drug arrests of African American female youths in California, and have arrest rates 50 times higher than their counterparts in other counties.

More than half of all youth drug felonies involved African Americans, who constitute 9% of the city’s youth; and one-third Latino males, who comprise 11% of the city’s youth.

Despite disproportionately high drug arrest rates among young African Americans in San Francisco, of the more than 2,000 residents and nonresidents in the city who have died from abuse of illicit drugs in the last decade, 6 in 10 were non-Latino Whites, and more than 7 in 10 were age 40 and older.

The Center on Juvenile and Criminal Justice (CJCJ) respectfully recommends that the San Francisco Human Rights Commission and San Francisco Board of Supervisors investigate and respond to these racially disparate trends of policing and arrest. It is arguable that this violates the human rights of African

Americans under the International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination (ICERD) and the anti-discriminatory clause of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (ICCPR), both signed and ratified by the United States. This publication concludes with three recommendations for consideration by the San Francisco Human Rights Commission and Board of Supervisors, to investigate and adequately address the concerns highlighted throughout this publication.

Publishing information:

April 10th, 2012 | Center on Juvenile and Criminal Justice

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DISCUSSANT: BEYOND WALLS AND CAGES: THE MILITARIZED AND CARCERAL GROUNDS OF US IMMIGRANT DETENTION

Author(s):


Alessandro De Giorgi

Immigrant detention is a paradoxical infrastructure of removal. In 2011, the US Department of Homeland Security removed almost 400,000 people from the country using a network of 250 detention facilities across the United States. Post 9/11 border security is only one impetus for the expanding detention system. This talk situates immigration enforcement in the landscape of US imprisonment and war-making. Understanding immigration detention’s place within longer histories of criminalization and militarization is important for forging concerted organizing strategies that can challenge walls, cages, and the war-making that sustains them.

Publishing information:

April 3rd, 2012 | Institute for the Study of Societal Issues, UC-Berkeley


SACRIFICED ON THE ALTAR OF PUBLIC SAFETY: THE POLICING OF LATINO AND AFRICAN AMERICAN YOUTH

Author(s):


Claudio Vera Sanchez and Ericka Adams

Past research has grounded young people’s experiences with the police in their neighborhoods and schools, yet lacking from the literature is how the interconnection between these two domains contributes to the hypercriminalization of Latino and African American youth. Forty interviews were conducted with nondelinquent Latino and African American youth who reside in disadvantaged and high-crime neighborhoods. Youths’ reports suggest a tidal wave of violence throughout their neighborhoods and schools, coupled with heavy surveillance and policing. Policy implications are discussed in terms of the school to criminal justice pipeline prevalent in disadvantaged neighborhoods.

Publishing information:


April 3rd, 2012 | Journal of Contemporary Criminal Justice, 27(3): 322-341

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CONTROL DE LA INMIGRACIÓN, POST-FORDISMO, Y MENOR ELIGIBILIDAD: UNA CRÌTICA MATERIALISTA DE LA CRIMINALIZACIÓN DE LA INMIGRACIÓN EN EUROPA – SPANISH

Author(s):


Alessandro De Giorgi, Ph.D.

Publishing information:


March 15th, 2012 | Critica Penal y Poder, 2: 139-162. (Spanish)

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COMPARING WEARER DNA SAMPLE COLLECTION METHODS FOR DETERMINING THE BEST METHOD FOR THE RECOVERY OF SINGLE SOURCE PROFILES

Author(s):


Steven Lee with C. Harris, A. Cardenas, B. Barloewen

Publishing information:


February 20th, 2012 | American Academy of Forensic Sciences Proceeding 18: 85-86.

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