Faculty Publications

 

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CHILDREN BEHAVING BADLY?: PEER VIOLENCE BETWEEN CHILDREN AND YOUNG PEOPLE

Author(s):


Herrera, V.M. & Stuewig, J.

Children Behaving Badly? is the first publication to directly address the complexity of peer violence from a range of disciplines and perspectives. Provides important insights into theoretical understanding of the issue and produces significant and far reaching implications for policy and practice developments Based on up-to-date research evidence and includes some unpublished findings from recognized experts in multidisciplinary fields Challenges many populist and damaging representations of youth violence and the associated narratives of modern youth as essentially ‘evil’ 

Publishing information:


February 5th, 2011 | Wiley-Blackwell Publishing. Chapter 11.


DR. STEVEN LEE PRESENTS RESEARCH AT 2011 AMERICAN ACADEMY OF FORENSIC SCIENCES MEETING

Author(s):


Steven Lee

Steven Lee recently attended and presented his research at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Forensic Sciences Meeting in Chicago.

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February 1st, 2011 | Bio Sample Storage in the 21st Century and beyond: The Cold War is Over, Get S.M.A.R.T. (Sample Management At Room Temperature). Chaired a workshop held at the 2011 American Academy of Forensic Sciences Meeting in Chicago.

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DR. STEVEN LEE PRESENTS RESEARCH AT 2011 AMERICAN ACADEMY OF FORENSIC SCIENCES MEETING

Author(s):


Steven Lee and Dinaro, E., Trogdon, C.

Steven Lee recently attended and presented his research at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Forensic Sciences Meeting in Chicago.

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February 1st, 2011 | Optimizing DNA Storage at Room Temperature: Teflon Tubes Vs. Polypropylene Tubes. Poster presentation at the 2011 AAFS Meeting held in Chicago, IL.

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DR. STEVEN LEE PRESENTS RESEARCH AT 2011 AMERICAN ACADEMY OF FORENSIC SCIENCES MEETING

Author(s):


Steven Lee and Baker, B., Trogdon, C.

Steven Lee recently attended and presented his research at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Forensic Sciences Meeting in Chicago.

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February 1st, 2011 | Analysis of N-4 STR Repeat Slippage with Amplification Enhancer on Low-quantity DNA Samples. Poster presentation at the 2011 AAFS Meeting held in Chicago, IL.

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EXPECTATIONS OF CHANGE: THE CONGRUENCY BETWEEN BEAT OFFICERS AND SUPERVISORS AND ITS IMPACT ON PROGRAMMATIC CHANGE

Author(s):


Mark E. Correia & David A. Jenks

While much effort has been put forth to understand the ongoing transformation of police agencies (e.g., toward community policing, implementation of innovative practices), few researchers have looked at those mechanisms involved in the change. Drawing upon data collected from an innovative agency, this study assesses the changes in expectations held by Beat Officers and Sergeants after a year in a newly‐implemented geographical beat system. Our findings suggest that congruency is more dynamic than previous studies have shown and that a geographical patrol strategy can increase officer’s community policing activities.

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January 16th, 2011 | Police Practice & Research: An International Journal, 12(1): 16-34.


THE ART OF YOGA PROJECT: A YOGA AND CREATIVE ARTS CURRICULUM FOR GIRLS IN CUSTODY

Author(s):


Danielle Harris with May Lynn Fitton

As girls enter the juvenile justice system, they stand on the precipice of a lifelong cycle of crime and incarceration, yet still have the opportunity to turn toward healing and rehabilitation. With this in mind, The Art of Yoga Project (AYP) has designed a gender-specific intervention that combines Yoga, visual arts, and creative writing to help girls learn how to create a positive future for themselves. This article introduces AYP and shares the goals, objectives, and experiences of the program. A thorough description of AYP’s comprehensive Yoga and Creative Arts Curriculum is provided, including a sample class plan and overview of the entire course. Eight principles of best practices are presented and discussed. We hope that this blueprint will inspire and empower other Yoga therapists to develop similar programs that serve this important and underserved population.

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October 20th, 2010 | International Journal of Yoga Therapy, 1(1): 110-118

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OPTIMIZING STORAGE AND HANDLING OF DNA EXTRACTS

Author(s):


Steven Lee, C. Crouse, and M. Kline

Nucleic acid sample storage is of paramount importance in forensic science, epidemiological, clinical and genetic laboratories. Millions of biological samples, including cells, viruses, and DNA/RNA, are stored every year for diagnostics, research and forensics. PCR has permitted the analysis of minute sample quantities. Forensic samples such as bone, teeth, touch samples and some sexual assault evidence may yield only low quality and low quantity DNA/RNA. Efficient storage of the extracted DNA/RNA is needed to ensure the stability of the sample over time for re-testing of the CODIS STRs, mtDNA, YSTRs, mRNA and other future marker typing systems.

Amplification of some or all of these markers may fail because the biological material has been highly degraded, contains inhibitors, is too low in quantity or is contaminated with contemporary DNA. Reduction in recovery has been observed with refrigerated liquid DNA extracts and also those exposed to multiple freeze-thaw cycles. Therefore, the development of optimal storage and amplification methods is critical for successful recovery of profiles from these types of forensic samples, since in many cases, re-testing is necessary.

This review is divided into three sections. Section One covers the background of forensic DNA storage, factors that influence DNA stability, and a brief review of molecular strategies to type non-optimal DNA. Section Two covers the importance of DNA extract storage in forensic and non-forensic DNA databanks, and the mechanisms responsible for loss during storage. Finally, Section Three covers strategies and technologies being utilized to store DNA.

Publishing information:


July 20th, 2010 | Forensic Science Reviews, 2010, 22:131-144

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IMMIGRATION CONTROL, POST-FORDISM, AND LESS ELIGIBILITY. A MATERIALIST CRITIQUE OF THE CRIMINALIZATION OF IMMIGRANTS ACROSS EUROPE

Author(s):

Alessandro De Giorgi

The apparent de-bordering of the western world under the impulse of economic globalization has been paralleled by a simultaneous process of re-bordering of late-capitalist societies against global migrations. This re-bordering is part of a broader punitive turn in the regulation of migration which has emerged, particularly in the European context, since the mid-1970s. On the one hand, non-western immigrants are targeted by prohibitionist immigration policies which in fact contribute to the reproduction of their status of illegality; on the other hand, the systematic use of incarceration (together with administrative detention and deportation) as the main strategy in the ongoing war against unauthorized immigration configures a dynamic of hyper-criminalization of immigrants, whose result is the intensification of their socioeconomic and political marginality across Europe. Following the materialist criminological approach known as political economy of punishment, this article suggests that these punitive strategies should be analyzed against the background of an increasingly flexible and de-regulated neoliberal economy: in this context, the hyper-criminalization of migrations contributes to the reproduction of a vulnerable labor force whose insecurity makes it suitable for the segmented labor markets of post-Fordist economies. 

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April 19th, 2010 | Punishment & Society (2010), 12, 2: 147-167

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INTIMATE PARTNER VIOLENCE IN YOUNG ADULT DATING, COHABITATING, AND MARRIED DRINKING PARTNERSHIPS

Author(s):


Veronica Herrera with Jacquelyn D. Wiersma, H. Harrington Cleveland, and Judith L. Fischer

Using data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, this study examined intimate partner violence (IPV) and drinking partnerships in 741 young adults in male-female dating, cohabitating, and married relationships. Cluster analyses revealed four similar kinds of drinking partnerships: (a) congruent light and infrequent, (b) discrepant male heavy and frequent, (c) discrepant female heavy and infrequent, and (d) congruent moderate/heavy-frequent drinkers. Overall, there were no significant main effect differences across relationship type and clusters. The type of relationship and the type of drinking partnership interacted with contexts examined (i.e., type of violence severity, gender, and whether the violence was perpetration or victimization). Given the severity of IPV in couple relationships, additional empirical attention to drinking partnerships is warranted. 

Publishing information:


April 1st, 2010 | Journal of Marriage and Family Volume 72, Issue 2, pages 360–374, April 2010

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OAKLAND POLICE DEPARTMENT RESIDENT OPINION SURVEY REPORT

Author(s):


Mark E. Correia and Melinda Jackson

The Survey and Policy Research Institute at San José State University conducted the Oakland Police Department Resident Opinion Survey December 12-14, 2009 and January 4-6, 2010. This telephone survey of 868 adult Oakland residents was conducted in English, Spanish, Cantonese, and Mandarin. The telephone numbers included in this sample were randomly generated by computer to ensure that both listed and unlisted numbers were included, from all landline exchanges in Oakland. An additional sample of cell phone numbers randomly selected from the 510 area code was included, with respondents screened to ensure that they were Oakland residents. A total of 45 surveys were completed by cell phone. Telephone numbers in the survey sample were called up to four times at different times and days to increase the likelihood of reaching eligible households.

The sampling error for the total sample is plus or minus 3.32 percentage points at the 95% confidence level.  Smaller subgroups have larger margins of error.  Results reported here are weighted by race and gender to match 2006-2008 American Community Survey  estimates for Oakland from the U.S. Census Bureau.

Publishing information:


January 20th, 2010 | Survey and Policy Research Institute, San José State University, San José, CA