Faculty Publications

 

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DIGGING OUT OF TROUBLE PUBLIC ARCHAEOLOGY AS REHABILITATION FOR JUVENILE DELINQUENTS

Author(s):


James Daniel lee, Philip J. Carr and Tiffanie N. Bruch.

This article reports an evaluation of an archaeology project carried out by the University of South Alabama (USA) Center for Archaeological Studies to complement an Intensive Aftercare Program for juvenile delinquents in Mobile, Alabama. The project was an eight-week field school for 14 adjudicated youth. The goals of the project were to teach archaeology, provide job skills, improve pro-social attitudes of delinquents, improve delinquents’ attitudes toward their local community, and reduce recidivism among delinquents. The evaluation was completed using a mixed methods approach including pre- and post-project questionnaires, weekly evaluations, comparisons with a matched sample, observations, and focus groups with staff. Findings are that students learned archaeology and formed positive relations with staff. There is no evidence that pro-social attitudes, ties to the community, or recidivism were altered. The quality of archaeology performed by the participants was high and the project beneficial to the Center. Such programs promise to be valuable components of juvenile intervention programs, adding education and job skills opportunities, but should not be expected to work as stand-alone interventions.

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September 15th, 2007 | Journal of Applied Social Science September 2007 1: 29-61

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IMMIGRATION AND CRIME RACE, ETHNICITY, AND VIOLENCE

Author(s):


Sang Hea Kil and Cecilia Menjívar

The original essays in this much-needed collection broadly assess the contemporary patterns of crime as related to immigration, race, and ethnicity. Immigration and Crime covers both a variety of immigrant groups–mainly from Asia, the Caribbean, and Latin America–and a variety of topics including: victimization, racial conflict, juvenile delinquency, exposure to violence, homicide, drugs, gangs, and border violence.

The volume provides important insights about past understandings of immigration and crime, many based on theories that have proven to be untrue or racially biased, as well as offering new scholarship on salient topics. Overall, the contributors argue that fears of immigrant crime are largely unfounded, as immigrants are themselves often more likely to be the victims of discrimination, stigmatization, and crime rather than the perpetrators.

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July 10th, 2006 | Immigration and Crime: Race, Ethnicity, and Violence, Eds. Ramiro Martinez Jr. and Abel Valenzuela Jr (Chapt. 8). New York: New York University Press.

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RE-THINKING THE POLITICAL ECONOMY OF PUNISHMENT

Author(s):


Alessandro De Giorgi

The political economy of punishment suggests that the evolution of punitive systems should be connected to the transformations of capitalist economies: in this respect, each ‘mode of production’ knows its peculiar ‘modes of punishment’. However, global processes of transformation have revolutionized industrial capitalism since the early 1970s, thus configuring a post-Fordist system of production. In this book, the author investigates the emergence of a new flexible labour force in contemporary Western societies. Current penal politics can be seen as part of a broader project to control this labour force, with far-reaching effects on the role of the prison and punitive strategies in general.

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June 1st, 2006 | Re-thinking the Political Economy of Punishment: Perspectives on post-Fordism and Penal Politics (2006). Aldershot: Ashgate, UK.

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DO GIRLS CHANGE MORE THAN BOYS? GENDER DIFFERENCES AND SIMILARITIES IN THE IMPACT OF NEW RELATIONSHIPS ON IDENTITIES AND BEHAVIORS

Author(s):


James Daniel Lee

Prompted by research suggesting females’ self-concepts are more interpersonally rooted than males’, I compare girls’ identity changes in reaction to relationships in new social contexts with boys’, testing whether identity change processes are the same for each sex. I use survey responses from 320 summer program students about five activity areas: (1) science & technology; (2) computers; (3) athletics & recreation; (4) beliefs & interests; and (5) arts & literature. While girls become more attached to and involved with others, their identity processes are equivalent to those of boys. Girls change more, but their change is rooted in greater sociability, not higher reactivity to new relationships. Findings vary by relationship and activity types, indicating sex differences may reflect gender role expectations.

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October 20th, 2005 | Self and Identity. 4: 131-47

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THE EFFECTS OF PARTICIPATION IN A CULTURAL AWARENESS PROGRAM ON JAIL INMATES

Author(s):


Yoko Baba and Chris Hebert

Cultural awareness/diversity training has been main-streamed into the educational curriculum and corporate training seminars. This paper is a description of a cultural awareness/diversity program administered as part of a post-release program in Santa Clara County (California). Participants were given pre- and post-program participation questionnaires designed to measure English proficiency, their awareness and pride in their own cultural traditions, cultural perceptions, and tolerance towards other cultural traditions. Participation in the program did not have statistically significant effects on cultural pride and tolerance of other cultures. The effects of the program on cultural perceptions were significant, but the direction of changes was the opposite of the authors’ expectations. That is, participants exhibited heightened awareness of inter-racial/ethnic differences. Implications were discussed.

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September 19th, 2005 | Journal of Ethnic and Cultural Diversity in Social Work (2005) 30 (3): 91-113

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GLOBALIZATION UNDER CONSTRUCTION: GOVERNMENTALITY, LAW, AND IDENTITY

Author(s):


Richard Perry and Bill Maurer, editors

Considers descriptions of humankind’s future, and the discourses of globalization that frame them, from perspectives in anthropology, geography, law, sociology, and cultural studies. The essays explore the forms, practices, and effects of governmentality integral to global modernity’s architecture.

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October 21st, 2003 | Globalization Under Construction: Governmentality, Law, and Identity. University of Minnesota Press.

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SPOUSAL ABUSE: VIETNAMESE CHILDREN’S REPORTS OF PARENTAL VIOLENCE

Author(s):


Yoko Baba and Susan Murray

This exploratory study used mailed questionnaires completed by 131 Vietnamese students to examine domestic violence patterns in parents’ marital relationships. Research objectives included: (1) gaining an understanding of spousal abuse among Vietnamese couples; and (2) assessing which variables (demographic characteristics, decision-making power, and cultural adaptation, beliefs in traditional gender roles, and conflicts in the family) are correlated with spousal abuse. Findings suggest that although both parents used reasoning, mental abuse and physical abuse in their marital relationships, Vietnamese fathers were more likely to be physically abusive than mothers. Additional variables associated with family conflicts are also examined. Research implications and suggestions for further research are discussed.

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July 21st, 2003 | Journal of Sociology and Social Welfare 2003, 30 (3): 97-122.

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PROTECTING ONE’S SELF FROM A STIGMATIZED DISEASE… ONCE ONE HAS IT

Author(s):


James Daniel Lee and Elizabeth Craft

Stigmatized persons and secret deviants typically try to avoid negative consequences of labeling by keeping quiet and restricting interactions to those who accept their situation. Research on stigmas using an identity theory approach is advanced, which claims that persons are motivated by the need to preserve relationships and to self-verify. Analyses of interviews with 20 respondents (9 men and 11 women, aged 21-38 yrs) from a genital herpes self-help group reveal that their negative, emotional reactions are rooted in social disapproval and, like other stigmatized persons, they use secrecy, withdrawal, and preventive telling as strategies to manage their stigma. It was found that these strategies are motivated by identity processes but that they are often insufficient to meet respondents’ needs. Consistent with the identity perspective, respondents take the somewhat ironic step of revealing their stigma in attempts to protect predisease relationships and self-concepts. Finally, genital herpes threatens self-concepts and relationships to the extent that it, definitionally, widely implicates identities or implicates more prominent identities. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved)

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April 10th, 2002 | Deviant Behavior, Vol 23(3), Mar-Apr 2002, 267-299

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FOR THEIR OWN GOOD: BENEVOLENT RHETORIC AND EXCLUSIONARY LANGUAGE IN PUBLIC OFFICIALS’ DISCOURSE ON

Author(s):


Sang Kil with Cecilia Menjívar

Menjívar and Kil use media analysis to explore the subtle exclusionary language in U.S. public officials’ discourse on immigrant-related issues. Their case studies, primarily of Latino immigrants, demonstrate how “liberal,” benevolent rhetoric can disguise exclusionary practices toward immigrants and criminalize their behaviors without proposing viable alternatives to improve the conditions being condemned. Benevolent rhetoric based on law and order often serves to substantiate the opponents of immigration, who use more restrictionist language.

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February 10th, 2002 | Social Justice Vol. 29, Nos. 1-2 (2002): 160-176

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VIETNAMESE GANGS, CLIQUES, AND DELINQUENTS

Author(s):


Yoko Baba

A study of data from a juvenile detention center attempted to: (1) classify Vietnamese delinquent youths according to status groups; (2) examine the characteristics (i.e., culture conflicts, bonds to parents and schools, and offenses) of each status group; and (3) investigate the differences in characteristics of delinquents and gang members. Gang members had more involvement in substance use and committed more status, nonviolent, and violent offenses than delinquents. However, there were no differences in the culture conflict and social control variables between gang members and delinquents. The study suggests that almost all immigrant youths, whether first or second generation, experience hardships and obstacles and some cannot overcome these hurdles throughout their youth. In the case of immigrant families, parents as well as children require much support and assistance, especially in language, employment, housing, and legal services. Schools cannot always expect Vietnamese parents to understand the American educational system and should work with parents to help young people cope with painful experiences. The study suggests the need for better measurements to assess culture conflicts and bonds to parents and schools.

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February 21st, 2001 | The Journal of Gang Research, 2001, 8: 1-20

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ON CITY-SPACES AND ARTS OF GOVERNMENT: A SYMPOSIUM, IN POLAR: POLITICAL AND LEGAL

Author(s):


Richard Perry, ed

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May 10th, 2000 | Anthropology Review, 2000, Vol. 23, No. 1: 65-137

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