Faculty Publications

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MIXED MESSAGES: WORLD WAR II AND THE USES OF ORAL HISTORY

Author(s):


Tony Platt

Comparing different sites dealing with the memory of World War II—a North American TV show, Ukrainian burial pits, and German memorials—Dr. Platt reflects on the uses of oral history and their power to raise critical questions about the present. 

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May 8th, 2013 | Social Justice: A Journal of Crime, Conflict & World Order. May 1, 2013

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A DISEASED POLITIC: NATIVIST DISCOURSE AND THE IMAGINED WHITENESS OF THE USA

Author(s):


Dr. Sang Kil

This article is an interdisciplinary attempt to theorize how racism functions in the most recent wave of nativist discourse to produce whiteness and the nation. First, I begin with a review of the current scholarship on the nativist debate about immigration. Second, I show how ‘racist dirt fixations’ work in a new colour-blind racist manner with the geographic scales to make sense of the wide range of dissimilar images in nativist discourse. Finally, I argue that nativist discourse creates a naturalized portrait of a white national body in danger from the criminal immigrant who represents dirt, disgust, abjection and disorder and produces racial tensions, anxieties and nightmares about borders and crossings at each scale.

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April 26th, 2013 | Cultural Studies, iFirst, April 22, 2013: DOI.1080/09502386.2013.789068

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DR. TONY PLATT PUBLISHES ARTICLE IN “NEWS FROM NATIVE CALIFORNIA”

Author(s):


Tony Platt

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January 11th, 2013 | (2012/13) The Yokayo vs. The University of California An Untold Story of Repatriation. News From Native California, Vol. 26 (2) Winter

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DR. DE GIORGI PUBLISHES CHAPTER

Author(s):


Dr. Alessandro De Giorgi

The project of interpreting contemporary forms of punishment means exploring the social, political, economic, and historical conditions in the society in which those forms arise. The SAGE Handbook of Punishment and Society draws together this disparate and expansive field of punishment and society into one compelling new volume.

Headed by two of the leading scholars in the field, Jonathan Simon and Richard Sparks have crafted a comprehensive and definitive resource that illuminates some of the key themes in this complex area – from historical and prospective issues to penal trends and related contributions through theory, literature and philosophy. Incorporating a stellar and international line-up of contributors the book addresses issues such as: capital punishment, the civilising process, gender, diversity, inequality, power, human rights and neoliberalism.

This engaging, vibrantly written collection will be captivating reading for academics and researchers in criminology, penology, criminal justice, sociology, cultural studies, philosophy and politics.

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October 26th, 2012 | (2012) Punishment and Political Economy in The SAGE Handbook of Punishment and Society. Edited by Jonathan Simon and Richard Sparks

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WOMEN, ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS, AND RELATED MUTUAL AID GROUPS: REVIEW AND RECOMMENDATIONS FOR RESEARCH

Author(s):


SARAH E. ULLMAN, PhD, CYNTHIA J. NAJDOWSKI, PhD, and ERICKA B. ADAMS, PhD

Recent literature reviews and meta-analyses have supported the effectiveness of Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) in helping membersstop drinking and maintain sobriety. Despite the extensive bodyof research on AA, less attention has focused on differences inthe efficacy of the program for and experiences of women as compared to men. Such a focus is warranted given that there are significant gender differences in the development and progression of alcoholism, impact of drinking, and response to treatment. This review synthesizes results of extant research on women in AA and similar mutual aid groups focused on problem drinking to describe the state of knowledge and make suggestions for future research.  Critiques of the ability of AA and 12-Step programs to address women’s needs are also reviewed, as are attempts to respond to those critiques. Understudied issues, including the role of victimization histories (which are more prevalent in women who abuse alcohol), are also discussed.

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October 11th, 2012 | Alcoholism Treatment Quarterly, 30:443–486, 2012. DOI: 10.1080/07347324.2012.718969

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‘‘WE ARE LIKE PREY’’: HOW PEOPLE NEGOTIATE A VIOLENT COMMUNITY IN TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO

Author(s):


ERICKA B. ADAMS, PhD

Urban communities in the Republic of Trinidad and Tobago have transformed into war zones; citizens report that crime and violence are the primary problems incapacitating their communities . Research has focused on the heightened levels of national homicide rates, gang violence, and juvenile delinquency. However, often ignored is how violence is negotiated and compromises the lives of citizens in Trinidad and Tobago. Using a grounded theory approach and 30 semistructured interviews with community members, this article investigates citizens’ responses to violence in an underprivileged predominantly Black community in Northwest Trinidad. Results suggest that the social and environmental context of the neighborhood fosters residents’ refusal to report witnessed violence, women’s implementation of self-imposed ecological imprisonment, and residents’ use of strategies (e.g., building walls) to create distance between them and other community members. Policy implications involve enhancing citizens’ sense of security and revitalizing bonds between community members.

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October 11th, 2012 | Race and Justice October 2012 2: 274-303, doi:10.1177/2153368712452434

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CONTROLE DE IMIGRAÇAO, PÒS-FORDISMO, E LESS ELIGIBILITY. A ECONOMIA POLÌTICA DA PUNIÇÃO E DO HIPERENCARCERAMENTO DOS IMIGRANTES NA EUROPA

Author(s):


Dr. Alessandro De Giorgi

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August 29th, 2012 | Discursos Sediciosos (Forthcoming)


FEARING YELLOW, IMAGINING WHITE: MEDIA ANALYSIS OF THE CHINESE EXCLUSION ACT OF 1882

Author(s):


Sang Hae Kil, Ph.D.

The Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882 was a watershed event in the context of race, nation, and the law because it denied Chinese immigration into the USA for over 80 years. This paper analyses the media coverage of the Chinese in the San Francisco Chronicle during the year of the Act’s passage. The theoretical framework of ‘Purity and Danger’ provides a starting point in analyzing how whiteness and nation are constructed as ‘pure’, while Chinese immigration is constructed as a ‘danger’ within a symbolic, racial and political manner. Discourse analysis was applied to the data for an intersectional investigation of race, class, gender, and nation, to determine how the discourse is organized thematically, as well as uncover ideological meanings in relation to how ‘fearing yellow’ also reflected ‘imaging white’ in media discourse.

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August 29th, 2012 | Social Identities: Journal for the Study of Race, Nation and Culture (August 9, 2012)

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FEMALE SEXUAL OFFENDING

Author(s):


Danielle Harris, Ph.D.

This chapter provides an overview of the nature and extent of sexual offending by women.  It reviews the many typological approaches that have been developed to explain female sexual offenders, including descriptions of what might considered “typical” examples of each classification.  In addition, the chapter focuses more specifically on the differential treatment that male and female sexual offenders receive in the news media and in the criminal justice system owing to their crimes.

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July 12th, 2012 | Violent Offenders: Theory, Research, Policy, And Practice. Edited by Matt DeLisi and Peter J. Conis. Jones and Bartlett Learning. Chapter 12: 207-220.

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TOWARD A TYPOLOGY OF SEXUAL BURGLARY: LATENT CLASS FINDINGS

Author(s):


Pedneault, A., Harris, D. A., & Knight, R. A.

Purpose

To understand fully the nature of residential burglary one must examine the situational context, and offender’s behavior during the burglary. Although several behaviors appear to be distinctly related to sexual burglaries, including voyeurism, fetishism, sexual violence, and sexual murder, a systematic typology of the characteristics of residential sexual burglary is lacking. The purpose of the study was to develop a typology of residential sexual burglary.

Methods

The present study investigated 224 incidents of residential burglary with recorded sexual components. A typology classifying these incidents was developed using Latent Class Analysis.

Results

Three types of sexual burglary were identified. Fetishistic noncontact burglaries typically occurred in unoccupied houses and involve fetishistic behavior, but no theft, violence, and weapon. Versatile contact burglaries were characterized by rapes occurring in apartments and involving theft, violence, and weapon. Finally, perpetrators of sexually oriented contact burglaries raped their victim in houses but these incidents rarely involved theft, violence, or weapon. Previous offenses were also analyzed; the three distinct types of burglary appear to be embedded in different prior offense histories. The practical implications are discussed.

Conclusions

This research underscores the importance of examining the situational context and offender’s behavior during a residential burglary with sexual components.

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July 1st, 2012 | Journal of Criminal Justice, 40(4): 278-284

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