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Joanna H. Fanos

Fanos, Joanna H.

Lecturer AY-B,  Psychology

E-mail
joanna.fanos@sjsu.edu
Additional Contact Information

Phone Number(s)
(408) 924-5622

Courses

Education

  • Doctor of Philosophy, Human Development & Aging (Department of Psychiatry)
    University of California, San Francisco, 1987

Bio

Dr. Fanos received her undergraduate degree from Columbia University and her Ph.D. in Human Development from the Department of Psychiatry at the University of California, San Francisco. Her work focuses on the impact of serious pediatric illness on the family, especially the well siblings. She has documented the long-term effects of growing up with and possibly surviving an affected sibling in such disorders as cystic fibrosis, ataxia-telangiectasia, X-linked severe combined immune deficiency, and alpha1 antitrypsin deficiency. In 1995 she was the only social scientist invited to spend a year in the Visiting Investigator Program at the National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of Health. Her book, based on in-depth interviews with adults who grew up with a sibling with cystic fibrosis, was published in 1996 (Sibling Loss, Lawrence Erlbaum, Mahwah, New Jersey). She was founder and director of the Sibling Center from 2002-09, a program at California Pacific Medical Center in San Francisco to help brothers and sisters of children and adolescents with various serious medical conditions. She has received NIH funding for nearly a decade, has published extensively and has given numerous presentations at medical centers throughout the U.S. Since 2004 she has been on the faculty of the Department of Pediatrics at the Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth in Hanover, NH. Since January 2008 she was Visiting Faculty and is now Affiliate Faculty at Stanford University's Center for Biomedical Ethics. Her current research projects include Parental Response to the Diagnosis via Newborn Screen of Critical Congenital Heart Disease, as well as Implementation of a Peer Support Group for College Football Freshmen.