Megumi Hosoda

Megumi Hosoda

Psychology

megumi.hosoda@sjsu.edu
408-924-5637


What research questions currently preoccupy you?

I have been interested in issues related to diversity in the workplace and have been examining different types of diversity (e.g., gender, race/ethnicity, disability). More recently, I have become interested in examining the experience of immigrants and how they are perceived and evaluated in the workplace.

What personal factors contributed to your research?

Probably, my background contributed to research in diversity in the workplace. I am Asian, a female, and an immigrant. Originally I came to the U.S. as an international student. I am always torn between two cultures, and I wonder if others like me feel the same way.

What has been most challenging in your research?

I do an experimental study to examine potential discrimination against diverse groups of people (e.g., women, ethnic minorities, immigrants) for hiring decisions using college students as participants. Although I can establish internal validity, external validity is always an issue for my studies because many of undergraduate students do not have hiring experience. Recruiting those with hiring experience as research participants is a challenge for me.

How has your position in SJSU contributed to your research?

Due to a large number of first generation/second generation students and foreign-born faculty at SJSU, my research focus has shifted to study issues related to immigrants or foreign-born individuals in the workplace.

A hidden (research) talent:

I am good at coming up with interesting research ideas!!

One book that changed your life (or research) & why:

Osamu Dazai gave me an appreciation of literary work.

A website/journal/newspaper (in your field?) you follow without fail:

siop.org (Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology), Journal of Applied Psychology, Academy of Management Journal

Advice you’d give to newer faculty or students:

To newer faculty, find a niche for your research, stick to it and become an expert on it. To students, get involved with faculty’s research. It will be great experience for you with a lot of excitement.

RSCA Accomplishments

The mediating role of POS on the relationship between perceived underemployment and perceived accent discrimination and job attitudes among immigrant workers (under review)
Mediators of Relationships Between Perceived Underemployment and Outcomes Among Immigrants. Poster will be presented at the annual meeting of Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology in April, 2016.