Justice Studies

Mission Statement

The Justice Studies Department provides students with a broadly interdisciplinary, research based understanding of issues of justice and injustice in our rapidly changing world. Students will acquire analytical, critical thinking, and communication skills useful in a complex and multicultural society, and be prepared for continued graduate studies, and for positions of responsibility in the justice related public agencies and nonprofit organizations.

Undergraduate Student Learning Outcomes

Undergraduate students will develop the skills and competencies needed to:

  1. (1-1) Undertake a critical analysis of and devise strategies around a contemporary problem in related to justice, broadly defined. Students will be able to competently define and describe multiple facets of the problem and propose policies and practices that could be implemented to help solve the problem.
  2. (1-2) Write an original paper (minimum 3,000 words) on a contemporary justice problem and its proposed solution in a manner that gives a clear introduction, rationale and purpose, addressing the issues/questions, uses an acceptable writing/speaking style and uses APA editorial style.
  3. (1-3) Demonstrate reasoning and argumentation in that indicates an accurate and complete understanding of the issues, use of examples, data and references to support knowledge claims, and logical presentation of ideas, drawing valid conclusions and policy implications.

Undergraduate students will have also demonstrate capacity for professional development in the Justice Studies field by:

  1. (2-1) Demonstrating oral and written communication skills sufficient for a justice professional within a justice studies internship placement setting.
  2. (2-2) Successfully integrating theory and practice in a real world, justice related setting.

Graduate Student Learning Outcomes

Graduate students in Justice Studies will develop:

  1. (1-1) The capacity to constructively criticize and evaluate research and to be a discerning consumer of research findings in the interdisciplinary Justice Studies field.
  2. (1-2) Competency in using SPSS (Statistical Package for the Social Sciences) to undertake basic and applied research.
  3. (1-3) Professional and intellectual skills in formulating research questions, choosing variables as indicators, managing and analyzing data, and presenting findings.

Graduate students will also develop competencies and skills necessary to:

  1. (2-1) Undertake critical review of current and seminal theory, research, policy and practice in three of four principal areas of justice study Ð police, courts, corrections, and juvenile justice.
  2. (2-2) Provide oral and written presentations of each review in a manner that gives a clear introduction, rationale and purpose, addressing the issues/questions, uses an acceptable writing/speaking style and uses APA editorial style.
  3. (2-3) Demonstrate reasoning and argumentation in each review that indicates an accurate and complete understanding of the issues, use of examples, data and references to support knowledge claims, and logical presentation of ideas, drawing valid conclusions
  4. (2-4) Synthesize different perspectives and data in a way that integrates the main ideas and research findings from multiple sources, and creates an informative way of viewing the subject as a whole from a balanced, scholarly perspective.

B.S.

Spring 2013 (doc)
Spring 2008 report by SLO (doc)
or Spring 2008 (doc)
Fall 2007 (doc)
Spring 2007 (doc)

M.S.

Spring 2008 report by SLO (doc) or Spring 2008 (doc)
Spring 2007 (doc)

  • Forensic Science

Program Planning Documents

Justice Study Program Planning Report 2007 (pdf)

This page last updated 09/04/13