WAC Workshops and Presentations -- Fall 2019

Paid workshops meet once a week (for 1 hour and 15 minutes) for four to six weeks. Work outside workshop meetings is usually 1-2 hours per week. Unpaid 1-day workshops meet for 1 hour and 15 minutes (and, obviously, involve no extra work).

Please sign up using the link below. 

Sign Up Here


Begins Week of September 9, Ends Week of September 30
(Registration is Closed)
Working With Embedded Writing Tutors
With Michelle Hager and Tom Moriarty, Directors of the University Writing Center and the Writing Across the Curriculum Program

hagertomWould you like to work with an embedded writing tutor? Someone who is trained -- and paid -- by the Writing Center, and then assigned to work exclusively with you and your students? If so, join us for this multi-week workshop and learn about the best practices for teaching writing in the disciplines; tutoring writing and the writing proces; innovative writing and writing-intensive course design; and creative approaches for integrating writing tutors into your course.

This workshop is a pre-requisite for applying to work with an embedded writing tutor. And all workshop participants will be paid $500.


Begins Week of September 16, Ends Week of October 7
(Registration is Closed)
(Re)Mapping the Student Body: Digital Literacy and the Digital Short
With Joseph Navarro, Department of English

navarroThis workshop will explore four specific questions that relate to the contemporary discussions around Digital Literacy, the role of the Digital Short in modern higher education, and its relation to the traditional essay and research process: 1) How does the Digital Short inform issues of accessibility, inclusiveness, and diversity in higher education? 2) In what ways does the Digital Short shape or reshape dynamics, structures, and hierarchies that are embedded in the academic learning environment? 3)How do we pedagogically navigate the intersection of digital media and information literacy? 4) What strategies and concepts may one utilize to assist students with developing the Digital Short?

In unpacking these questions, we will first touch on the idea of the rhetorical Student Body and how it navigates both traditional modes of literacy through our modern understanding of Digital Literacy and critical thinking skills within the Digitalscape. We will then unpack some issues surrounding this modern paradigm. Specifically, how Truth is challenged by our new technological reality, and how we Perform in a variety of social contexts both inside and outside of the classroom. We will then ground this discussion in the theoretical principles of Implicated Scholarship, Distant and Lateral Reading and Writing, and what a Process based approach means in relation to creating the Digital Short in the realm of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) alongside the traditional process of composing the academic essay. Finally, we will unpack the application of the Digital Short through a step-by-step break down. Alongside this process, we will also provide Tools and Resources so that instructors may adjust this activity according to their own endemic classroom and syllabus needs. Each participant will develop a portfolio including the creation of a Digital Short alongside an assignment prompt and lesson plan.

Workshop participants will be paid $500.


Begins Week of October 7, Ends Week of October 28
(Use the Sign Up Link at the top of the page to vote for days and times)
Reinforcing Metacognition: Learning from Reflections on Writing
With Alesya Petty, Departments of Health Professions and English

pettyMetacognition is a powerful tool for understanding one's own thought processes; however, it is often not given enough attention by students and teachers. The most familiar form of it is reflection, usually on a finished project and the process that took place to accomplish it. But there is more to it. What often goes unstated is that reflection requires specific skills and relies on awareness of how writing can enhance one’s ability to learn. The power of reflection cannot be underestimated! So come reflect on what role metacognition plays in your teaching and how you can leverage reflection as a way of gaining insights into not only what students learn, but how they learn it. By discussing ideas and literature on metacognitive practices, you will be able to create meaningful reflective assignments to support student understanding of their own cognitive skills, which in turn will help raise awareness of the kind of  writing that is empowering and can last a lifetime.

Workshop participants will be paid $500.


Begins Week of October 7, Ends Week of October 28
(Use the Sign Up Link at the top of the page to vote for days and times)
How to Design and Host a Graduate Writing Retreat
With Amy Russo and Tom Moriarty, Writing Center Coordinator of Multilingual Writing and Director of the Writing Across the Curriculum Program

amytomAll faculty and staff are invited to learn how to run graduate writing retreats in their departments. Participants will learn how to advertise, organize, and run these retreats. The workshop will focus on practical advice based on what we have learned from running retreats in Fall 2018 and Spring 2019. For example, we will introduce how to run discussions and do goals setting to teach time management techniques and conduct peer review.

Priority will be given to participants who are committed to running a retreat during the Spring 2020 semester. The Writing Across the Curriculum program will offer $300 matching grants in the Spring to help pay for snacks and supplies.

And workshop participants in the Fall will be paid $500.


Begins Week of October 28, Ends Week of November 18
(Use the Sign Up Link at the top of the page to vote for days and times)
Document Design
With Sara West, Department of English

west

When we talk about "writing" courses, we rarely talk about document design. This may be the case because many of us struggle with document design ourselves, so we may be unaware of some of the basic tools that are available. Students are uninformed about making their documents look nice, and it's really one of the easiest things they can do to improve readability and audience understanding -- especially with technical documents. While a nice design doesn't make up for a lack of clarity and cohesion, it can actually help students better understand these concepts as well. 

In this four-week seminar, we will begin by discussing some basic tenets of document design and how you can explain these ideas to your students. We will talk about the relationship between document design and rhetorical situation, particularly audience. We will also do hands-on demonstrations and work with Microsoft Office Styles and Adobe Spark, as well as other Adobe tools.

Workshop participants will be paid $500.


Submitting a Tenure Dossier on eFaculty: A Quick Guide
With Mark Thompson, Department of English

markThe university recently adopted eFaculty as the portal through which tenure-line faculty now submit their materials. I teach technical writing in the English department and was asked to write a guide to help faculty through the process. In my guide, I answer such universal questions as “what goes where?” and “does this go here?” and “what do I do with this?”.  In addition to getting tenure line faculty started on the process, the guide points to university and departmental RTP resources, and explains the process of submission, decision, and faculty responses to committee decisions. I also give some tips on organizing info and writing the narrative that accompanies materials. As someone who just submitted my materials for tenure, I also bring the understanding of how stressful this process can be, even if the publications are in and all things are all looking good.

This presentation will cover getting started with eFaculty, as well as give tips on applying based in my experience and that of others. I’m not giving a comprehensive seminar in applying, just a human-based approach to filling out all the digital fields now required by the university.

Also: This guide was initially written for the English department; I plan to expand it to be of use to all tenure-line faculty at SJSU. In light of this, I’d love to hear from people outside my department about their experiences with eFaculty and any concerns with or comments on the new system.

Workshop Dates and Times (Offered in conjunction with the Center for Faculty Development as part of their Dossier Prep Workshop).

Monday, September 9, 1:30-2:30 PM, in IRC 210. 
Tuesday, September 10, 1:30-2:30 PM, in IRC 210. 


World Englishes in U.S. Classrooms: Working With Indian English Speakers
(Guides to Common Multilingual Language Differences Series: Indian English -- Standard American English)
Principal Investigator: Sharmin Khan, Department of Linguistics and Language Development

khanSpeakers of World Englishes, particularly Indian English varieties, populate our graduate STEM classes and yet there are no guides on how to interpret some of the differences between Standard American English (SAE) and Indian English (IE). Indian English, although a legitimate dialect of English and not an aberration, creates confusion and misunderstanding both on the part of instructors and students themselves. This resource guide explains some of the basic differences between IE and SAE in terms of syntax, meaning, and usage. It will facilitate teaching SAE to Indian international students in a pedagogically sound, yet culturally sensitive manner.

Workshop Dates and Times:
Wednesday, September 25, 3:00PM-4:15PM, in Clark 124 (right next door to the Writing Center offices)
Thursday, September 26, 3:00PM-4:15PM, in Clark 124 (right next door to the Writing Center offices)


Guides to Common Multilingual Language Differences: Hindi -- English
Principal Investigator: Avantika Rohatgi, Department of English

rohatgiIndia is a land of linguistic diversity with 22 official languages and 720 dialects. Yet, Hindi happens to be the most widely spoken language across the nation with English coming in as a close second. In fact, India boasts of having the second highest number of English speaking people in the world. However, for a vast majority, English is a second language. As such, numerous errors creep into the speech and writing of an average English-speaking Indian. In order to correct the most common errors in the usage of English by Indian writers, it is imperative that we understand how the language works, so that we are able to connect with our students and help them learn English more effectively.

Workshop Dates and Times:
To Be Announced Soon!


100W and 200W Coordinators Get Together
With Tom Moriarty, Department of English and Writing Across the Curriculum Program

tomMeet other 100W and 200W course coordinators, eat some free snacks, and share ideas for teaching, administering, and assessing your courses. Each get together will be flexible in nature, with an emphasis on being as useful and informative as possible. 

Dates and Times:
Wednesday, November 13, 3:00PM-4:15PM 


Working With Undergraduate Student Writers
With Tom Moriarty, Department of English and Writing Across the Curriculum Program

tomWhether we teach 100W, writing-intensive, or content courses, all of us work with students writers. It's one of the best and most rewarding parts of our job. So join us for an informative workshop and discussion of best practices for working with these students, learn about writing support and professional development opportunities available on campus, and learn how to structure your assignments and feedback practices for maximum results (without creating any extra work for yourself).

Workshop Dates and Times:
Tuesday, October 15, 3:00PM-4:15PM
Wednesday, October 16, 3:00PM-4:14PM


Working With Graduate Student Writers
With Tom Moriarty, Department of English and Writing Across the Curriculum Program

tomWhether it's a graduate-level GWAR course, a graduate content, lab, or methods course, or advising a thesis or dissertation, there are many strategies for working with graduate student writers that are different from working with undergraduates. Join us for an informative workshop and discussion of best practices for working with these students, learn about writing support and professional development opportunities available on campus, and learn how to structure your assignments and feedback practices for maximum results (without creating any extra work for yourself).

Workshop Dates and Times:
Tuesday, October 22, 3:00PM-4:14PM
Wednesday, October 23, 3:00PM-4:14PM


 

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