Research output

  • Kataoka, R., & Koo, H. (2019). Effects of variability and internal structure on malleability of phonetic categories: A case of [i] vs. [u]. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 146(4), 3053.
  • Swan, Julia Thomas (Accepted, March 13th, 2019). “The Low Back Merger Shift: A Change in Progress in Vancouver, BC and Seattle, WA.” Invited paper in Publications of the American Dialect Society The Low-Back-Merger Shift: Uniting the Canadian Vowel Shift, the California Vowel Shift, and short front vowel shifts across North America.
  • Swan, Julia Thomas (Accepted, November 3rd, 2018). “Bag across the border: A comparison of /æg/ raising in Seattle, WA and Vancouver, BC”
  • Swan, Julia Thomas and Molly Babel (2018). “Dialect Identification Across a Nation-State Border: Perception of Dialectal Variants in Seattle, WA and Vancouver, BC,” Penn Working Papers in Linguistics 24.2, Select papers from NWAV 46, Madison, WI.
  • Kataoka, R., & Koo, H. (2017). Comparing malleability of phonetic category between [i] and [u]. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 142(1), EL42-EL48.
  • Swan, Julia Thomas (2017). “Canadian Raising on the rise in Vancouver? A phonetic comparison of Vancouver, BC and Seattle, WA,” Proceedings from the Annual Meeting of the Canadian Linguistic Association, May 28th, 2017: Toronto, ON.
  • Kataoka, R., & Koo, H. (2016). Is perceptual learning influenced by inherent variability of phonetic category? Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 139(4), 2014.
  • Swan, Julia Thomas (2016). “Canadian English in the Pacific Northwest: A phonetic comparison of Vancouver, B.C. and Seattle, WA,” Proceedings from the Annual Meeting of the Canadian Linguistic Association, May 28th, 2016: Calgary, AB.
  • Sumner, M., & Kataoka, R. (2013). Effects of phonetically-cued talker variation on semantic encoding. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 134, EL485-EL491.
  • Wheeler, Rebecca and Julia Thomas (2013). “And Still The Children Suffer: The dilemma of Standard English, social access and social justice.” JAC, volume 33, no. 1-2
  • Thomas, Julia and Timothy Grinsell (2012). “Finna as a Socially-Meaningful Quasi-Modal in African American English.” Conference Proceedings of the Society on the Underrepresented Languages of the Americas 7, eds. Hannah Greene.
  • Kataoka, R. (2011). Phonetic and Cognitive Bases of Sound Change. (Doctoral dissertation). University of California at Berkeley.
  • Thomas, Julia (2011). “Gender and /aɪ/ monophthongization in African American English,” Berkeley Linguistics Society: Proceedings of the Annual Meeting: Issue 37.
  • Yu, Alan; Abrego-Collier, Carissa; Baglini, Rebekah; Grano, Tommy; Martinovic, Martina; Otte, Charles III; Thomas, Julia; and Urban, Jasmin (2011) "Speaker Attitude and Sexual Orientation Affect Phonetic Imitation," University of Pennsylvania Working Papers in Linguistics: Vol. 17: Iss. 1, Article 26. Available at: http://repository.upenn.edu/ pwpl/vol17/iss1/26
  • Kataoka, R. (2010). Phonetic description of a three-way stop contrast in Northern Paiute. UC Berkeley Phonology Lab Annual Report 2010, 316-347.
  • Kataoka, R. (2009). A study on perceptual compensation for /u/-fronting in American English. Proceedings of the 35th annual meeting of the Berkeley Linguistics Society, 156-167.
  • Kataoka, R., & Johnson, K. (2007). Frequency effects in cross-linguistic stop place perception: A case of /t/-/k/ in Japanese and English. UC Berkeley Phonology Lab Annual Report 2007, 273-301.